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  1. #11
    nick mulder's Avatar
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    I'm attracted by Pt/Pd for the amount of time I can spend out of the darkroom (as opposed to being in locked in a darkroom) - portraiture is also very social - with WPC I'd build all the associated tools that allow relative daylight processing ... The near on instant result (compared to film) is also going to be an interesting new component to the process...
    Last edited by nick mulder; 09-20-2009 at 12:18 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Cleared the bowel problem, working on the consonants...

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by nick mulder View Post
    I'm attracted by Pt/Pd for the amount of time I can spend out of the darkroom (as opposed to being in locked in a darkroom) - portraiture is also very social - with WPC I'd build all the associated tools that allow relative daylight processing ... The near on instant result (compared to film) is also going to be an interesting new component to the process...
    One of the appeals of wet plate for me is the ability to produce clear glass ambros that can then be used as negatives for pt/pd prints. If you go to Kerik Kouklis' web site you can see some gum bichromate over platinum prints using collodion neagatives.

    http://www.kerik.com/gumover.htm
    "Fundamentally I think we need to rediscover a non-ironic world"
    Robert Adams

  3. #13
    John_Brewer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Chinn View Post
    One of the appeals of wet plate for me is the ability to produce clear glass ambros that can then be used as negatives for pt/pd prints. If you go to Kerik Kouklis' web site you can see some gum bichromate over platinum prints using collodion neagatives.

    http://www.kerik.com/gumover.htm
    Jim, Kerik makes collodion positives and makes digital negatives from these.

    Making WPC glass negatives for other alt processes is easy enough, I've done it with Carl Radford and Quinn. Some negs do need intensification though, particularly albumen, POP and palladium.

    J.
    ~John~
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    www.johnbrewerphotography.com
    There are 10 types of people in this world - those who understand binary and those who don't.

  4. #14
    RobertP's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nick mulder View Post
    I'm attracted by Pt/Pd for the amount of time I can spend out of the darkroom (as opposed to being in locked in a darkroom) - portraiture is also very social - with WPC I'd build all the associated tools that allow relative daylight processing ... The near on instant result (compared to film) is also going to be an interesting new component to the process...
    Nick yes a lot can be done in daylight conditions but keep in mind that the sensitizing of the plate and loading it into the wet plate holder and then developing the plate must be done under red-light darkroom conditions.

  5. #15
    RobertP's Avatar
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    darkbox

    Nick, I'm not a reenactor but i did have to build a period correct setup for a few shoots I was doing. Most of the time I work out of a darkroom van that I built but here is a few pics of a period correct setup that I built. If you'll notice the darkbox in the photo is where the plates are sensitized and developed.http://www.apug.org/forums/attachmen...1&d=1255876962
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_0458.jpg  
    Last edited by RobertP; 10-18-2009 at 10:10 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #16
    nick mulder's Avatar
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    yup, understood re. the dark time - I've watched a few vids online and its seems ok - most of my time in the darkroom for pt/pd is tray developing the negs...
    Cleared the bowel problem, working on the consonants...

  7. #17
    Colin Corneau's Avatar
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    I have a magazine article at home somewhere, telling of a fine arts photographer who uses a small wetplate tintype camera - using some digital work he creates a negative that he uses to make a Pt./Pd print.

    If you'd like I can find it and get you the info.

  8. #18
    nick mulder's Avatar
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    If I have to resort to scanners and photoshop I don't see it as a particular benefit - I'd rather fork out for fp4 in 11x14"/8x10" and shoot in-camera negs than use a digi-print transparency film (what do you call it?) ...

    As much as I like the fashionable WPC look - swirly petzvals, process aberrations etc.. - I'd like to be able to produce some clean plates too, thereby potentially no longer having to buy any film...

    That is the goal anyway, anecdotally I hear that I have quite a chore ahead of me
    Cleared the bowel problem, working on the consonants...

  9. #19

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    I have seen a couple of platinum prints contact printed from large glass plates. They are exquisite. Printing from a glass plate is no different than printing a negative. I have printed from glass plates (non-collodion) and had no problems. I made a plate holder for my enlarger to hold 4x5 glass plates out of aluminum but a thin stiff plastic would work equally well.

    The issue with enlarging collodion would be the fact that every pouring flaw, as well as debris in the collodion would be magnified. But after pouring enough plates one should be able to achieve close to flawless pours. For some, these "flaws" are what give a collodion image its character.

    One could also create an enlarged negative from a wet plate by the traditional method using ortho/lith film.
    "Fundamentally I think we need to rediscover a non-ironic world"
    Robert Adams

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