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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by photomem View Post
    I had not thought of that, I am using 645 Negatives so I will get tiny prints, but they might look interesting.
    Just some thoughts from my own science in the kitchen time...
    a) tea bags TOTALLY work when you are wanting to tone a print. Mind, that which tea you are using and if it has any additives and preservatives changes the effect. I found that black teas were by far the best.
    b) rapid fix does work when put into a concentration of about 6:1. I can't find the precise ratio at this moment but it does work.
    c) I found that the best negs were made on my black and white printer on acetate (or by oiling/waxing the paper after) sometime a two or three layered neg was necessary to ensure the density needed but its WAY cheaper than kinkos or using any fancy papers.

    Albumen was by far one of the best processes for the kitchen. And egg whites that have a bit of yolk in them make an excellent face mask!

  2. #22

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    A couple of things that could be helpful-

    Matt albumen is much easier than the glossy,and imo,a much nicer and more unusual finish.

    http://206.180.233.165/library/monog...lly/chap5.html

    a photogram could be an interesting way to go with food especially if you have a good mandolin.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photogram

    Don

  3. #23

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    David- would you happen to have examples of how gold toned and selenium toned albumen prints differ in appearance? I've been trying to find an image of a selenium toned print and have been so far unsuccesful.

    Thanks!
    Tom Persinger
    www.f295.org

    The F295 Historic Process Workbook is now available on Amazon:
    The F295 Historic Process Workbook: 4 Processes, 6 Techniques, 14 Lessons

  4. #24
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tpersin View Post
    David- would you happen to have examples of how gold toned and selenium toned albumen prints differ in appearance? I've been trying to find an image of a selenium toned print and have been so far unsuccesful.

    Thanks!
    I checked my files and I don't have a side by side comparison of the same print in gold and in selenium , but I've attached a test print from a 6x6cm neg, fixed for 1 min. in TF-4 and toned for 3 min. in KRST 1:32. You might compare it to some of the gold-borax toned albumen prints I've posted on my flickr site at--

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidag...7611396199449/

    or this one in my APUG gallery--

    http://www.apug.org/gallery1/showima...&cutoffdate=-1

    --and you can see that there's a range of tones possible with gold as well. The more neutral ones are toned longer. For selenium toning, it seems more common to fix then tone, while with gold toning, one tends to tone then fix in plain hypo, or at least that's what I do.

    It's hard to compare from scans, really, if they're not scanned and adjusted uniformly at the same time, since the differences are subtle, but I'm working on a calibrated monitor, and I look at the print in hand and the image on the screen, and try to adjust the digital image so that it looks like the print, which it never quite does. I find the selenium toned albumen prints a little duller than gold toned.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails AlbumenPrint,TF-4-1',KRST1-32,3'.JPG  
    Last edited by David A. Goldfarb; 11-20-2009 at 09:29 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  5. #25

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    Thanks David! much appreciated....
    Tom Persinger
    www.f295.org

    The F295 Historic Process Workbook is now available on Amazon:
    The F295 Historic Process Workbook: 4 Processes, 6 Techniques, 14 Lessons

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post
    Read Reilly's book, which you can download from albumen.stanford.com
    I found the book (actually at http://albumen.conservation-us.org/l...graphs/reilly/) and it's great!

    I'm just on chapter 4, where it talks about coating the paper with the albumen solution. That solution calls for 1 litre of albumen... just how many eggs does that take?! I've got three chickens wondering around the garden, but they'd be hard pushed to produce enough!

    Cheers,
    David.
    Creative Image Maker e-magazine is back! Find out more at http://creativeimagemaker.blogspot.com

    Thank you.

  7. #27
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    You need enough albumen to fill the tray of whatever size you're using. I recommend flat bottom trays for all aspects of albumen printing to keep the solution quantities reasonable. You generally want to coat the paper one size larger than your print size and trim the coated, sensitized paper to the size of the neg. Some people like to have an oversized sheet of paper, but then remember you're gold toning all that excess space, and you'll go through toner faster.

    I once figured out how many eggs you needed per liter, but it's been a while since I started from that point. I have a couple of jars of albumen and some stock of albumenized paper, and I just keep adding to them as needed. I think it's around 40 large egg whites per litre.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  8. #28
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    About 5 dozen extra large eggs. So if you buy about 25 more good layers you should be all set. And don't forget a good rooster to keep those hens in line. With the yolks you can make cheese cake for all your neighbors too. John Coffer claims about 2 dozen per 500ml. But if I remember correctly 2 dozen came up a little short of 500 ml for me. Also make sure you remove all chalaza from the albumen. Edit....I spoke to soon, I just checked my notes and I was getting 30 ml per egg
    Last edited by RobertP; 11-25-2009 at 08:20 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #29

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    Thank you for the speedy responses!

    So apart from costing a small fortune in eggs can I make up my litre or so of albumen solution and then just keep coating papers until it has pretty much run out?

    If I am to coat 8x10 sheets, or thereabouts, roughly how many sheets could I reasonably expect to coat? Are we talking 5 or 6, or nearer to 30-35? Or more?

    I'm kind of tempted to try this with some medium format negs to start with, before moving on to printing the glass plates, just to minimise the variables for me!
    Creative Image Maker e-magazine is back! Find out more at http://creativeimagemaker.blogspot.com

    Thank you.

  10. #30
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    You need a certain amount of surplus to float the paper on the albumen, so it depends on how you're counting. If you're coating 8x10 sheets for whole plate or smaller prints, you probably want at least 1.5l in the tray, and then you can coat at least 25 sheets, I'd guess. The limiting factor is usually drying space.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

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