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  1. #1
    Joe VanCleave's Avatar
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    Paper Negatives + Adapted Optics Goodness

    More playing around with adapted optics mounted on my 4"x5" Speed Graphic, using the trusty 150mm binocular lens, stopped down to F/8. Exposures timed via the curtain shutter.

    Preflashed grade 2 paper negatives.

    Madrid, NM.

    ~Joe






  2. #2

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    I love them. The subjects and the materials are perfect together!

    Anne

  3. #3
    MetaGeorge's Avatar
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    This looks great! I would love to know which types of paper/dev you have found to work with paper negs?

  4. #4
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Sweet!
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  5. #5
    Joe VanCleave's Avatar
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    Thanks for your comments. I use Freestyle's Arista brand RC grade 2 paper as an in-camera negative; have been doing so for a few years now. I've commented previously on APUG about using this paper as a negative medium, by preflashing the paper to an otherwise faint gray tone, and the use of slightly dilute developers. I like either Agfa Neutol WA, or Ilford Universal Paper developer, diluted around 1+15. I rate the paper's Exposure Index around 12, assuming the developer is fresh, and at 68f.

    Other folks seem to get good result in controlling excess contrast with paper negatives by using a yellow filter over the lens and using multigrade paper; I never went the way of the yellow filter because in pinhole photography you can detect evidence of the presence of the filter over the aperture if there are flaws in the filter. I also like the idea of a predetermined contrast grade for a negative media, something you can't get with sheet film itself. And I don't like the idea of the scene's coloration affecting the contrast of the negative, which is what happens with using multigrade paper. But, that's just me.

    So, I stick with using the grade 2 Arista as my film, and use multigrade fiber paper for contact prints. Also, I've yet to get involved with contact printing paper negatives onto Lodima silver chloride paper; that will be something for the future.

    ~Joe

  6. #6
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Interesting that you preflash to a faint grey; some will say that you shouldn't go so far as to see any tone change, but I am not going to argue with your success!
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  7. #7
    Joe VanCleave's Avatar
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    That is an interesting point you raise, Keith. When I first began preflashing, several years ago, I did just that, doing a test strip and choosing the preflash time just prior to visible grayness in the negative. But subsequent experience with the paper negative process has taught me that a well-exposed paper negative doesn't and shouldn't look like a well exposed positive print. That is, the paper negative shouldn't just be a negative version of the finished positive print.

    The purpose of the paper negative, as with film, is to capture as much of the scene's tonal range onto the limited range available on the paper as is possible. My theory about preflashing is that the shadow detail of the scene has to be easily distinguished from the paper's otherwise unexposed whiteness. Preflashing raises the toe (shadows) of the response curve, without overexposing the shoulder (highlights).

    I think it is possible to overdue the effect, excessively preflashing, which can cause the midtones to be muddy and lack separation. So there's a fine balance of giving the negative just the right amount.

    I have lots to learn about this process. I really have not explored the possibilities offered by alternative developers, like the ones used to gain continuous tone images from APHS film, for instance (Soemarko's developer, IIRC). But working with paper is a real kick, and feels liberating, and gives more immediate results than sheet film (the paper can be easily rinsed and dried much quicker, and it only has problems of dust spots on the emulsion side, rather than both sides as with film). The downside is the lack or red sensitivity, hence its slow speed.

    ~Joe

  8. #8
    Iwagoshi's Avatar
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    So Joe, with regard to pre-flashing the paper, my expired, fogged Kodak Panalure might be ok as a paper negative? Developed without any BZT inhibitors?

  9. #9
    Whiteymorange's Avatar
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    Way cool, Joe

  10. #10

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    I am playing with a lot of things the last year and I just stumbled opun using paper as a negative. Can you tell me how the prefalshing works and what kind of Iso I have to think of? That way I can try out 8x10 without wasting to much paper. I will be experimenting anyway but I like to have a guideline. And what paper would be best. Fiber based or coated paper? I will be looking on google as wel but I would appreciate the input here.
    Thanks.
    Reality is whatever stays when you stop believing in it.
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    darkroomninja.blogspot.com

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