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  1. #1

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    Rockland Tintype Reticulation

    So I'm trying to make "tintypes" with the Rockland Colloid chemicals, that is Ag+ Emulsion and developed in Dektol 1:1 mixed with Ammonium Thiocyanate. I am using Fuji Sensia 100 E6 film through and enlarger to expose the plates. I cut aluminum stock, which was then spray painted with black enamel spray paint. At f/2.8 the exposure was around 10 sec for a 3"x3.5" plate. I let the developer "ripen" for about an hour and a half in an open tray. The emulsion was moderately evenly coated and the first attempts resulted in complete reticulation of the emulsion which then just washed off.
    The process was as follows:
    Expose
    Develop (About 2-3 minutes)
    Fix (5 Minutes)
    Wash in water just over room temperature

    The Rockland instructions specify to use cool water, so the remaining plates were washed in colder water. Using a colder rinse the thin emulsion reticulated, while the thicker emulsion seemed to be alright.

    I am thinking that this is happening because the plates were not fully dry- I coated them, then cooled them with a hairdryer. Perhaps the developer has not ripened long enough, but I doubt this is the case because the problems came with the final rinse.

    I would appreciate any thoughts on this.

  2. #2
    EASmithV's Avatar
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    The longer it's wet, the more susceptible to damage it is. I'd let it dry a bit after the fix, and the wash, etc, later.
    www.EASmithV.com

    "The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera."— Dorothea Lange
    http://www.flickr.com/easmithv/
    RIP Kodachrome

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by mrsquig View Post
    I cut aluminum stock, which was then spray painted with black enamel spray paint.
    Spray painted aluminum does not work, order trophy aluminum (the stuff they engrave the winners name on). I use Aluminum Engraving Stock .025" thick,Buffed Bright Aluminum Black

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by EASmithV View Post
    The longer it's wet, the more susceptible to damage it is. I'd let it dry a bit after the fix, and the wash, etc, later.
    Normally you DO want to leave in water after the fix and wash it after that.

  5. #5

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    For trophy aluminum you can get it from "Main Trophy Supply" at 800-323-6054 or 847-439-2550. Talk to Dan, he's very familiar with wet-platers.

  6. #6
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    If your using the emulsion wet, ie set but not dried, you really need to use a hardener in the emulsion or developer. Whatever you do don't let the plate dry a bit after fixing as that will cause bleaching of the image by the fixer.

    In addition you ned to key the paint surface so that the emulsion will bod with it, a light rub with some 600/1200 grit wet & dry will usually be sufficient.

    Ian

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by eoghan View Post
    Spray painted aluminum does not work, order trophy aluminum (the stuff they engrave the winners name on). I use Aluminum Engraving Stock .025" thick,Buffed Bright Aluminum Black
    I was under the impression that the rockland kit is a dry plate process. On the modernphotography website they mention using spray painted aluminum with no problems. The enamel spray paint is not normal spray paint and it provides a slightly rough surface for the emulsion to bond to.

  8. #8
    EASmithV's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eoghan View Post
    Normally you DO want to leave in water after the fix and wash it after that.
    I stand corrected... duhhhh....
    www.EASmithV.com

    "The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera."— Dorothea Lange
    http://www.flickr.com/easmithv/
    RIP Kodachrome

  9. #9

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  10. #10

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    What is the ratio of cyanate to developer you are using? I have been going with 1gm per oz. of developer.

    I have found that temperature really makes a big diference in the emulsion holding together, but too much cyanate will eat it up. I am going to try using chrome alum in my emulsion to see if that helps. I never had a problem with the rockland developer causing problems on there emulsion. I wonder what there secret is.

    Kodak D19 stock solution also makes a very good developer for these things, but I am using my own emulsion, and it has a bit of a fig problem that I am going to try to fix. I am also going to test the rockland developer with my emulsion and my developer with the rockland emulsion and see what happens.

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