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  1. #11
    ann
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    not to beat a dead horse, but fog fog fog,

    Ir film is best IMHO handled in complete darkness.
    http://www.aclancyphotography.com

  2. #12
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgcull View Post
    >>Also -- if you really want to get the best use out of HIE, you need to use at least a red 25 filter. Yellow-orange will not be enough to give you an infrared effect.<<

    Have a look at this photographer's portraits. In much of his older work he used IR film with yellow or orange filters. I *love* his IR work.

    I'm experimenting. I did get some pretty nice inside IR images on 120 film with a deep yellow filter. There's nothing pretty on these rolls, but I'm not giving up.

    Thanks so much for your replies.

    http://normanrileyphotography.com/page1.html
    Very nice work. I can see why you like it.

    There is some halation there, but not all that much, and the effect I see has more to do with how IR renders skintones. If halation isn't what you're after, then you really might do better with a current and fresh IR film. My concern is that even if you do get the occasional roll of the HIE to work out for you... if the hit rate is low then your remaining stocks will quickly disappear. Perhaps best to learn how to get what you want by other means. Let me suggest superpan or sfx with a soft focus lens (e.g. the rb 150 SF or an imagon).
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  3. #13
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    You also need to remember that IR film will pipe light the length of the film like a fiber optic if the end is exposed to fairly bright light. Do it in the dark!
    Gary Beasley

  4. #14
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    We discussed light piping ad nauseum in the chatroom last night, you should come join in, Gary!

    IIRC one of my aerial films has a warning about light piping. Methinks it has more to do with the base material being estar than the emulsion itself. It is indeed quite fiber optic.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  5. #15
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    The base support for the infra red films contains carbon. This is an effective barrier for light piping after about the first foot or less. The big problem is the fibre barrier at the opening in the 35mm cartridge. The IR can get through that and extend the light piping up the edges. So, under normal conditions there is no severe problem, but with a bright surround, the condition becomes very much worse.

    PE

  6. #16

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    It just looks like leakage in to the cassette to me. You must load and unload this film in complete darkness, and also keep it as cold as possible. The same goes for any 35mm IR film, but especially for the ones with higher IR sensitivity, such as HIE and Efke IR820. The light trap on 35mm cassettes is not a reliable way to keep out IR radiation! The 120 light traps are much better at this, and you can get away with loading them in the shade of your body. Data sheets usually state this plainly. It is good practice to read the data sheet for your films.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

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  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    The cannister, alone, will NOT protect IR film from fogging if it is sitting in a bright spot, even in room light.

    This is most likely your source of fogging.

    PE
    The light would have to be extremely bright. I used HIE for 15 years and never had a roll fogged by exposing the canned rolls to light. I used a changing bag to load the camera and stored the exposed film in the Kodak cannister it was sold with and never had fogging issues.

    I did have 10 rolls that had age fog that I purchased from a camera store in Charleston years ago. That was totally different from what this user seems to be experiencing.

    Don Bryant
    Don Bryant

  8. #18
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    Don;

    I meant the cartridge with light trap, not the black can with gray top. Sorry for the unclear post. See my post #15 for clarification.

    PE

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