Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,917   Posts: 1,584,726   Online: 749
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 22
  1. #1
    Marco B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,983
    Images
    169

    Gregory Colbert's process for printing?

    Hi all,

    Recently revisited Gregory Colbert's website (http://www.ashesandsnow.org/en/home.php) again, and his images started to make me wonder what process he is using. Admittedly, he seems to be "secretive" about his exact working processes, but I did find this quote on the site:

    "These mixed media photographic works marry umber and sepia tones in a distinctive encaustic process on handmade Japanese paper. The artworks, each approximately seven feet by twelve feet, are mounted without explanatory text so as to encourage an open-ended interaction with the images."

    Now we can always speculate , so do some of you have some good ideas about what processes he uses to achieve the "look" and colors (split tone brown-blueish?) of his prints? Some or a lot of the images seem to have a bit of lith appearance, but I am probably the last one to comment on such things, as I have never done lith printing, nor any of the real alternative processes. It also somewhat reminds me of some of the tea-toned cyanotypes I have seen passing by in the APUG galleries...

    So what are your suggestions and speculations about how he might achieve his world famous "look"...

    Marco
    My website

    "The nineteenth century began by believing that what was reasonable was true, and it wound up by believing that what it saw a photograph of, was true." - William M. Ivins Jr.

    "I don't know, maybe we should disinvent color, and we could just shoot Black & White." - David Burnett in 1978

    "Analog is chemistry + physics, digital is physics + math, which ones did you like most?"

  2. #2
    Barry S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    DC Metro
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,264
    Images
    31
    I'm not familiar with Colbert, but they sure look like digitally split toned inkjet prints. My guess is they're inkjet prints on some special paper, and finished off with a light coating of encaustic wax on the surface.

  3. #3
    Marco B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,983
    Images
    169
    Quote Originally Posted by Barry S View Post
    I'm not familiar with Colbert, but they sure look like digitally split toned inkjet prints.
    Well, they probably shouldn't be, see this comment on the Vision page (http://www.ashesandsnow.org/en/vision/):

    The Ashes and Snow exhibition includes more than 50 large-scale photographic artworks, a one-hour film, and two short film "haikus". None of the images have been digitally collaged or superimposed. They record what the artist himself saw through the lens of his camera. While Colbert uses both still and movie cameras, the images are not stills from the film.

    although admittedly, this phrase does not exclude your suggestion of digital printing... it merrily says the images were not heavily Photoshopped before printing... he can also be seen to using an analog movie film camera in one photo (choose the "The Film" link on the Vision page), so he definitely does burn film.

    Marco
    My website

    "The nineteenth century began by believing that what was reasonable was true, and it wound up by believing that what it saw a photograph of, was true." - William M. Ivins Jr.

    "I don't know, maybe we should disinvent color, and we could just shoot Black & White." - David Burnett in 1978

    "Analog is chemistry + physics, digital is physics + math, which ones did you like most?"

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Wilmette,Illinois, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    728
    ___________________________________________

    Richard Wasserman

    http://www.richardwasserman.net

  5. #5
    Marco B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,983
    Images
    169
    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Wasserman View Post
    Thanks Richard, this settles some points, but it also raises some new interesting discussion points:

    A 40" x 80"(!) Polaroid camera film and a Polaroid transfer from that??? Anyone who can tell a bit more about this and how it would create "The Look" (disregarding the d......l reproductions of those, who we do not have to discuss here)

    And if he used Polaroids, did he enlarge his 35 mm negatives onto the Polaroid or so well, probably easier to create an enlargement and photograph that onto Polaroid, but I had never before heard of a 40" x 80" Polaroid camera...
    Last edited by Marco B; 11-24-2009 at 01:07 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    My website

    "The nineteenth century began by believing that what was reasonable was true, and it wound up by believing that what it saw a photograph of, was true." - William M. Ivins Jr.

    "I don't know, maybe we should disinvent color, and we could just shoot Black & White." - David Burnett in 1978

    "Analog is chemistry + physics, digital is physics + math, which ones did you like most?"

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Wilmette,Illinois, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    728
    ___________________________________________

    Richard Wasserman

    http://www.richardwasserman.net

  7. #7
    Marco B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,983
    Images
    169
    OK, thanks Richard. If I understand it right, the camera Joe McNally used for his Ground Zero images, must be the same as Gregory used than, as it is described as a one-of-a-kind 4x9 feet camera (image size), which seems to be about the same as the 40"x80" images of Gregory. I doubt if there are / were more cameras like that in the world.

    Still wonder what he did to the transfers to get that final look... and how do you transfer a 40x80 inch fragile emulsion layer without completely ruining it?
    My website

    "The nineteenth century began by believing that what was reasonable was true, and it wound up by believing that what it saw a photograph of, was true." - William M. Ivins Jr.

    "I don't know, maybe we should disinvent color, and we could just shoot Black & White." - David Burnett in 1978

    "Analog is chemistry + physics, digital is physics + math, which ones did you like most?"

  8. #8
    Rolleiflexible's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    New York City
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,274
    Images
    31
    Oh please.

    They are inkjet prints. And if
    the images are as he saw them,
    then how do you account for the
    photographs in which he has inserted
    himself? And how is he pulling 40x80
    Polaroids underwater?

    http://www.voice-international.net/c.../colbert03.jpg

    With enough corporate funding and ego,
    one can accomplish much. Just look at
    all the fantastic ad copy shot each month.
    But cloaking this mumbo-jumbo with the
    mantle of "art" is a bit much.

  9. #9
    Marco B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,983
    Images
    169
    Quote Originally Posted by Rolleiflexible View Post
    Oh please.

    They are inkjet prints. And if
    the images are as he saw them,
    then how do you account for the
    photographs in which he has inserted
    himself? And how is he pulling 40x80
    Polaroids underwater?
    You are completely right the exhibition prints in his Nomadic Museum are inkjet, but he doesn't claim he is shooting 40x80 inch polaroids directly, he's shooting either movie film or 35 mm. The link about the inkjet printing suggests he originally used the Polaroid process as some kind of intermediate or final step to produce his images... but he, I am the last one to suggest that that is true, just wondering if there are others with suggestions or knowledge of what he really did.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rolleiflexible View Post
    And if
    the images are as he saw them,
    then how do you account for the
    photographs in which he has inserted
    himself?
    He, I am for hire as your assistant-with-camera if you have plans to swim inbetween the wales

    At least the start of his project (1992) was well out of the digital age, so he surely must have used some film?
    My website

    "The nineteenth century began by believing that what was reasonable was true, and it wound up by believing that what it saw a photograph of, was true." - William M. Ivins Jr.

    "I don't know, maybe we should disinvent color, and we could just shoot Black & White." - David Burnett in 1978

    "Analog is chemistry + physics, digital is physics + math, which ones did you like most?"

  10. #10
    Barry S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    DC Metro
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,264
    Images
    31
    Quote Originally Posted by Rolleiflexible View Post
    ...

    With enough corporate funding and ego,
    one can accomplish much. Just look at
    all the fantastic ad copy shot each month.
    But cloaking this mumbo-jumbo with the
    mantle of "art" is a bit much.
    +1

    The whole thing looks like "high kitsch" to me. Like Thomas Kincade for a richer demographic. All the glitzy production and special presentation boxes and Japanese kozo and encaustic wax and high concept--but the images don't connect at all for me.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin