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Thread: PALLADIUM

  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by MVNelson View Post
    Since the process is so expensive, do yourself a favor and read Dick Arentz's book. It is a great reference and will save you lots of money up front ...

    miles
    I second the recommendation. You can also find information on Dick Arentz's web site for the Na2 method. http://www.dickarentz.com/na2.html

    As others have pointed out, NA2 is used with pure palladium, not with platinum or with platinum plus palladium. NA2 offers contrast control over a fairly wide range of negative DR values, but the color of the print changes with addition of the metal, becoming more neutral with greater amounts of Na2

    NA2 is not the only effective method of contrast control with pure palladium. Adding a small amount of dichromate to the developer also offers a wide range of contrast control while keeping the same print color. This method is not often mentioned but I personally know a number of pt/pd printers who use it.

    Sandy King

  2. #12

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    palladium

    Classic Palladium Kit from B+S includes Ferric Oxalate #1; Ferric Oxalate #2; and Palladium Sol #3..that's what I bought...so sorry to everyone for the confusion; I always assumed I was making platinum/palladium prints with NA2 process....not relevant here as I was just asking for any tips on making Palladium prints
    It truly amazes me how many ways one can carve up the pie!! thanks everyone!!
    Peter

  3. #13

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    I checked with Tillman Crane ( a classy guy as well as great instructor), and he recommends the traditional #2 method for Palladium - the ferric oxalate + chlorate for contrast control. It will keep the warm tone of Palladium whereas even small amounts of Na2 will cool a print. He doesn't recommend the dichromate in developer method. He mentions that paper will influence the tone; and, of course, developer and temperature with warm potassium oxalate being best choice.
    van Huyck Photo
    "Progress is only a direction, and it's often the wrong direction"

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by doughowk View Post
    I checked with Tillman Crane ( a classy guy as well as great instructor), and he recommends the traditional #2 method for Palladium - the ferric oxalate + chlorate for contrast control. It will keep the warm tone of Palladium whereas even small amounts of Na2 will cool a print. He doesn't recommend the dichromate in developer method.
    Did Tilman mention why he does not recommend the dichromate method of contrast control? When I compared the dichromate and FO+chlorate methods some years ago they appeared to have the same pros and cons and final image quality was just as good with either method. Neither method causes a change in print color, and both methods result in a grainy look if too much of the contrast agent is used. The only difference between the two methods so far as I could determine was purely logistical in terms of how the two contrast agents were used in practice.

    Sandy King

  5. #15

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    I have read some information about the Platinum and Palladium processes, and of course one cannot help but be very impressed with the lovely prints that are obtained with such materials. I am curious as to the cost of undertaking P and P printing. Can one provide any reasonable estimate as to the cost of materials? Not including the brushes and other materials necessary to coat the paper...just the cost of the paper(s) and the chemicals. I had always thought that the cost of undertaking P and P printing was quite a bit more then conventional silver printing....even if one uses Lodima and amidol. Am I correct in my supposition?

  6. #16
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    Perhaps during the learning process it is more expensive, but once you get over the hump, and have your negatives dialed in, most of the time your first print is a good one. So, even if a pt/pd print is 3x more materials cost wise than a standard silver-gelatin paper, you don't have the waste that you do with silver.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mahler_one View Post
    I have read some information about the Platinum and Palladium processes, and of course one cannot help but be very impressed with the lovely prints that are obtained with such materials. I am curious as to the cost of undertaking P and P printing. Can one provide any reasonable estimate as to the cost of materials? Not including the brushes and other materials necessary to coat the paper...just the cost of the paper(s) and the chemicals. I had always thought that the cost of undertaking P and P printing was quite a bit more then conventional silver printing....even if one uses Lodima and amidol. Am I correct in my supposition?
    http://www.bostick-sullivan.com/
    there is a good place to start. You can get a starter kit to try out. It is most important to be the sort of person who is comfortable working with such a craft oriented or craft necessary process. It plays well into my compulsive obsessive ways. There is a world of perfectionist things to get lost in. And then of course exciting results sometimes.

    Dennis

  8. #18

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    You can buy starter kits for most processes at either B&S or at Photographers Fornulary. These kits are great for folks who have no experience with a process and just want to try it out. However, the kits tend to be quite expensive compared to buying the chemicals and paper in quantity and might give one the wrong impression about the relative costs of a given process compared to another.

    Although I have not made a good study of the issue my impression is that the cost difference between printing with pure paladium and regular silver papes, including Lodima, is not all that great, and may actually be less with palladium, depending on the specific price one pays for the chemistry and paper. The comparison is complicated because while the cost of silver papers is fairly fixed there are many options available with pt/pd that vary the final price per print.

    Sandy King
    Last edited by sanking; 01-16-2010 at 08:25 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by sanking View Post
    Did Tilman mention why he does not recommend the dichromate method of contrast control? When I compared the dichromate and FO+chlorate methods some years ago they appeared to have the same pros and cons and final image quality was just as good with either method. Neither method causes a change in print color, and both methods result in a grainy look if too much of the contrast agent is used. The only difference between the two methods so far as I could determine was purely logistical in terms of how the two contrast agents were used in practice.

    Sandy King
    I agree with Sandy on this one. I tested both methods thoroughly a few years ago, albeit with a pl/pt mix and not pure palladium. I decided to go with the dichromate method because it fit with how I work. I didn't notice any difference in print tone or color with the two methods.

    As for cost, I recommend that beginners use small negatives to save on materials. You can learn as much from printing a medium format or 4x5 negative as you can from printing an 8x10.

  10. #20

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    Interesting responses concerning the relative costs. I admit to being surprised, having believed that the PT./PL. was much more costly. I did correspond with someone on APUG about the costs, and such costs were broken down a bit. Using an enlarger for projection printing and 4x5 negatives, and using conventional FB MG paper, would appear to be considerably less money-but, of course, produces entirely different results then contact printing using either Lodima or platinum or palladium methods.

    How do most of you expose your paper? Depending upon the sun would appear to be somewhat "iffy".

    Thanks for taking the time and effort to chime in.

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