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  1. #21
    clay's Avatar
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    I'll bet there would be a market for that. There is just a huge amount of things to both learn and acquire to get into the process.

    I agree with you about the roller size issue. Conrad will upsize the roller on request. For the larger presses, you can get a upsized top roller as large as 8-1/2".

    There is no doubt that the screen technique is easier to learn and removes a variable that can be hard to pin down. Not to mention the whole debate whether you should put the ground on the plate before the tissue or on the plate after the tissue is attached....

    One thing that is also easy to underestimate is the need to develop the technique and skill to consistently ink wipe and print a good plate. If you are doing this in isolation, the calibration process for your positive could be very difficult because you are chasing a moving target.

    When I first learned the process, I assumed that the printing part of it would be sort of easy and mechanical. This notion could not be further from the truth. The manner in which you ink and wipe can really make HUGE differences in how your print will look. And that only comes with lots of practice. It is quite eye opening to watch someone who has been doing this for thirty years take a plate you have been struggling with and quickly and efficiently produce a beautiful print.

    Quote Originally Posted by squinonescolon View Post
    I've been really toying with the idea of making a photogravure how-to video, selling a kit that includes all the chemicals, and then offer something like a year of proofing on my press to people who buy both.

    That way they could spend a whole lot less and try everything at home without having to buy a press or go to a workshop far away from where they live. And they get the benefit of somebody that can guide them and tell them what they are doing wrong. Most photogravure workshops start around $750 and you have to travel to them for a minimum of three days, which could be another $600-$1000 for room and board in the cities where the top photogravurists live.

    I wonder how many photographers would be interested in something like that. Is there a way for me to gauge consensus on something like that with the forums' software, anyone has any sugestions?

    I saw the prints at Crown Point Press, they are beautiful. The print you link to is nice, but the stunner of the group is this one The brilliant quality is something I've never seen on a photographic print before, no matter what the technique. It's a tour de force in printmaking.

    About the Conrad, it's probable that it will work. The thing is, the smaller the diameter of the roller the least likely you'll be able to get a print. I should clarify. Most presses can exert the pressure. The problem comes pulling the print. It becomes very inconsistent and difficult to do an even print. But of course you would have to try it to be sure. The problem is, unless you know someone who does photogravures, and they let you borrow a plate to test, it becomes a chicken and an egg kind of proposition.

    And Clay you're 100% correct about using dustgrain for photogravures. But it's easier and more consistent to learn with the screen. Learning how to lay down and control an aquatint can take just as long as learning to do photogravure! It's an art in itself.
    Steven
    I just want to feel nostalgic like I used to.


    http://www.clayharmon.net - turnip extraordinaire

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by clay View Post
    One thing that is also easy to underestimate is the need to develop the technique and skill to consistently ink wipe and print a good plate. If you are doing this in isolation, the calibration process for your positive could be very difficult because you are chasing a moving target.
    That's why I think this would be the best way to do this. People would learn the mechanical steps, and the difficult part would be asbtracted away by using the screen and "remote" proofing, once the student knows how to make a good plate, they can find a press in their own area to print, and build their own rosin box to do it the traditional way.

  3. #23
    clay's Avatar
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    I think that is a very good approach. Let people get the mechanical part down until they are producing a decent plate, then they can track down a press and know that any problems are due to the printing stage, not the etching stage.
    I just want to feel nostalgic like I used to.


    http://www.clayharmon.net - turnip extraordinaire

  4. #24
    nick mulder's Avatar
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    That octopus just doesn't translate to the net huh - however, after observing some cuttlefish recently I can see the potential for photographic reproduction - amazing colors and literally alive...

    As for the plates post etching I'll be working with a professional printer so I'll be learning the printing side of things with her as I go along.

    I think a class or *anything* over and above a list of steps in a forum would be helpful - but I'll still give it a crack otherwise, I learned Pt/Pd in isolation, it was years before I actually saw a Pt/Pd print that wasn't my own - and yes, I did learn a lot from it... What I thought were mistakes in my printing could be put to use with outcomes that could only be described as beautiful - I did also note that my prints were holding up at least technically against some of the stuff I was looking at.

    But CMYK gravure... hmmm, trumps Collodion even ? (ok, yes... who really is counting)
    Cleared the bowel problem, working on the consonants...

  5. #25

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    Nick,
    I found the forum I referred to in my earlier post, hope it helps.
    Mike

    http://bostick-sullivan.invisionzone...p?showforum=59

  6. #26
    nick mulder's Avatar
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    Thanks! - I linked up above also - lost in all the other info I suppose, which is a good thing
    Cleared the bowel problem, working on the consonants...

  7. #27

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    learning photogravure

    Nick, did you get your question(s) answered? Also, where do you live?

    Last month I did a photopolymer gravure workshop with Mark Nelson and Paul Taylor in New Hampshire. This is the modern variant of the traditional copperplate photogravure.

    Regards, David.

  8. #28

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    I know this is an old thread, but this error is too glaring to ignore. Joe VanCleave said: " It might help to work with a local printmaking shop, the type that use etching presses, since after the copper plate is properly made it's mechanical reproduction."
    I started working with polymer plate photogravure fairly recently. Under no circumstances can one REMOTELY say that "after the copper plate is properly made it's mechanical reproduction". There is a sea of possibilities in the way a plate can be printed. Nothing "mechanical" about it, whatsoever!

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