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  1. #31
    AgX
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    David,

    `Fixing´ a filter screen to the emulsion could become troublesome in case this would be a permanent fixing, as the processing would have to take place though the screen.
    This is why in the Lumiere Autochrome, the Agfa Farbenplatte (both random screen) the Polaroid Polavision/Polachrome (both regular screens) the screen layer is situated on the base.

    However, there have been other materials where the screen was loose and would be placed on top of the emulsion. This yields the advantage of making copies much easier. But it needed a regular screen as well as it needed aligning of the viewing screen to positive. These materials are called duplex-systems.
    Last edited by AgX; 02-05-2010 at 09:27 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: correcting on Dufaycolor, retracting critique on PE's post

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    Yes; if the 'screen plate' looked like the autochrome layer of dyed potato starch / lampblack, I guess you would not have to go through the effort of reproducing the original autochrome manufacturing approach, but could achieve a very similar pointillist effect. You could either use an existing panchromatic emulsion (easy, perhaps), or paint an emulsion onto the back of the screen plate. Definitely worth thinking about.

  3. #33
    Athiril's Avatar
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    I just thought of an idea that would be able to have an 'autochrome' like process for black and white stock for motion picture..

    Was thinking about depth of field adapters for videl cameras.

    This would work better for 8mm and 16mm cameras due to the lengthening of the camera size with depth of field adapters..

    General idea is to use a screen plate that also ground on the rear side, or printed OHS plastic etc stuck to the rear of it perhaps.

    Then same process as the rest of the dof.. macro lens/dioptre in front of host lens focussing on the on the GG.

  4. #34
    AgX
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    Autochrome-like random filter screens are good for still photography. But the random spread of filter grains yielded a flicker-effect in the past when employed in cine-films for testing.

    A regular filter screen has been used in Polavision motion picture film. But this was instant imaging material.

  5. #35
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    Kodak used a lenticular screen product many years ago that yielded quite good color images. A similar system is used today for some 3D still systems.

    PE

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Kodak used a lenticular screen product many years ago that yielded quite good color images. A similar system is used today for some 3D still systems.

    PE
    Sounds very interesting! Are those screens commercially available, at a reasonable price?

  7. #37
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    Not as far as I know. Kodak did make and sell them for a while. They can also produce a pseudo motion effect in 3D similar to that seen in Back to the Future II, when the shark comes out of the photo at Marty. In this case, Kodak made posters using lenticular screens for Jurassic Park and Star Trek that were 3D and had motion. As you walked past a Dinosaur or the Enterprise moved across the poster and either towards or away from you.

    The screens must be applied permanently to either the face of a finished print or the back of the film before use IIRC. There are descriptions of this in several historical treatments of color photography. I believe Friedman has a complete description of it, but I have not looked at it for years.

    PE

  8. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    Autochrome-like random filter screens are good for still photography. But the random spread of filter grains yielded a flicker-effect in the past when employed in cine-films for testing.

    A regular filter screen has been used in Polavision motion picture film. But this was instant imaging material.
    ???

    That is amazing... I would love to see such a film... do you know if any such products ever made it into a movie we can actually still see?

    I had no idea the Polavison film was used for motion picture film...

    I am a little surprized that the flicker didn't just blur itself out....

    Other than the problem with use in motion picture film, what other differeces were there between random and regular screens?

    Ray

  9. #39
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    Well, Ray, there is the obvious problem that the Dufay regular screen looked, well, kinda regular, and was quite visible. The Autochrome screen could be less visible in large plates of say 5x7 size. In smaller plates, they were both rather bad.

    As noted earlier though, Autochrome was never coated on film material under that name. Dufay and Autochrome were coated on glass, and Dufay under its own name was coated on film.

    PE

  10. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Not as far as I know. Kodak did make and sell them for a while. They can also produce a pseudo motion effect in 3D similar to that seen in Back to the Future II, when the shark comes out of the photo at Marty. In this case, Kodak made posters using lenticular screens for Jurassic Park and Star Trek that were 3D and had motion. As you walked past a Dinosaur or the Enterprise moved across the poster and either towards or away from you.

    The screens must be applied permanently to either the face of a finished print or the back of the film before use IIRC. There are descriptions of this in several historical treatments of color photography. I believe Friedman has a complete description of it, but I have not looked at it for years.

    PE
    I have seen quite a few examples of those screens... but what size scale are the ones you mention were done at Kodak? I don't think I have ever seen them done in poster size.... How much did they sell for at that size?

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