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  1. #51
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    To my understanding both me and Ian were wrong a bit:

    Lumière called their first screen film Lumière Filmcolor, but added the designation "Portrait Film Autochrome"

    The later two films were just called Lumière Lumicolor and Lumière Alticolor.

    see here for Alticolor (the same for Lumicolor):
    http://page6.auctions.yahoo.co.jp/jp...064#enlargeimg
    None of us are wrong, Lumière sold both the Filmcolor and the Lumicolor films with the added designation that they were Autochrome type process films, adapted for high speed use.

    That practice still goes on today where Fuji call Velvia & Provia - Fujichrome, and there are plenty of other examples.

    The difference between Filmcolor and Lumicolour is the first was a sheet film and the second roll film.

    Ian

  2. #52
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ray Rogers View Post
    I wonder... was the word "Autochrome" ever used the way one might use "Kleenex" or "Xerox" where a popular product name begins to be used to represent an entire group of smilar items... did "Autochrome" ever become synonymous with "color picture"?
    I don't see any hint at "autochrome" being used as generic for natural colour photographs.

    But the same time I doubt that all random filter screen photographs designated as "Autochrome" are really such.

  3. #53
    Martin Reed's Avatar
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    Slightly off-topic but maybe I can tack it on here - I've got 5 packs of unexposed Autochrome plates on their way to me, 1913 vintage, presumably the same batch no. Which is enough to do some tests to attempt to make an image - has anyone any experience of trying to process original Autochromes, and the problems encountered?

  4. #54
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Martin, I have the Autochrome reversal developer formulae if you haven't got them already, let me know if you need them.

    Ian

  5. #55
    Martin Reed's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    Martin, I have the Autochrome reversal developer formulae if you haven't got them already, let me know if you need them.

    Ian
    Thanks Ian, I probably have them already - BJP published a monthly supplement on colour photography from 1907 onwards, I've got the bound volumes for 1910, 11 & 12. It looks like they responded very quickly to Autochrome coming on the market, and most of the content is Autochrome oriented. If there's any interest here I could PDF them, but they'll be big files, each volume is about 100 pages.

  6. #56
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    George Brown, the editor of the BJP at that time, seems to have had his finger on the pulse, he must have known people like Mees of Wratten & Wainright long before he left the UK for Rochester to set up EK Research. He also seems to have kept abreast on what was happening in the rest of Europe.

    Ian

  7. #57
    Martin Reed's Avatar
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    Having just looked through the BJP colour supplements, it would seem that Lumiere didn't put a use-by date on the plates for nothing - plates within a year from the expiry date were giving problems, so forget any chances of getting anything after a century. However, it will still be an interesting exercise to at least go through the motions of loading & processing, & maybe writing it up.

  8. #58

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    For the benefit of the curious, here are the instructions that came inside a box of Autochrome plates.

    Anyone have the other pamphlets mentioned in this text?

    Charley
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Autochrome-Inst-(Fr).jpg   Autochrome-Inst-(Eng).jpg  

  9. #59
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    A Modern Autochrome

    I had posted this idea on an older thread about Autochromes, but a friendly member directed me to this more recent thread.

    I have an idea that I'd really like some feedback on... I've concocted a method to (fairly) easily make a modern autochrome-esque, additive color photograph.

    My method would eliminate the need to devise a complicated and archaic potato-starch reseau. However, I'm sure a lot of you autochromistes' main interest lies in creating this reseau the old fashioned way, so my method might not interest you. But for those who would just like to have a unique color photograph using additive color, this might excite you as it has me.

    So, to produce a reseau by the simplest means possible, just take a picture of a white TV screen with slide film. That's it! You've got a RGB screen w/ built in lampblack, and the ability to tweak the balance by affecting tint, contrast, brightness, etc, using nothing more than the controls on your old CRT television. It would be interesting to find the optimum magnification, the optimum exposure, and so forth, but it's something that anybody could do. You just send it away for processing like normal.

    So now you've got a RGB screen. Next, just *simply* attach some equally sized black and white film to the reseau, expose, reverse process, and boom, you've got a modern autochrome.

    *Simply* though, I think not. The trick is in this part, and it's where my knowledge and experience breaks down. But basically, you'd need to adhere the reseau and b&w film together so that you could process the b&w & not harm the slide film.

    To make the b&w emulsion accessible and w/o the need to de-register the sheets, I'm thinking to soak off the anti-halation layer and epoxy it to the slide reseau with the emulsion facing towards the open, not sandwiched inside where no chemicals could penetrate. So you'd be exposing through the reseau and base of the film.

    I'm guessing that processing of the b&w would seriously harm the slide film if not protected (tell me if I'm wrong). So you'd have to coat the slide reseau with a clear epoxy, coat the edges to make sure no chemicals got inbetween the sheets, and then carryout the reversal processing.

    Now.... I don't know the first thing about (a) removing the AH backing, (b) appropriate adhesives/epoxies, or (c) reversal processing. I just know that these things are possible, and I'd love to hear what people have to say regarding the feasibility of all this.

    Thanks!

    Chris Holmquist
    holmburgers

  10. #60

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    Bertrand Lavedrine's recent book on Autochromes

    Like many of you, I'm interested in recreating the Autochrome process.

    Through Amazon France, I recently purchased a copy of Bertrand Lavedrine's 2009 book, L'autochrome Lumiere: Secrets d'atelier et defis industriels. It certainly appears to be encyclopedic, and it includes a how-to-do-it chapter on making the plates. Here is the URL of the book description, in French, at Amazon.fr:

    http://www.amazon.fr/Lautochrome-Lum...4815295&sr=8-6

    Unfortunately, I don't know French. I discovered that the Getty Conservation Institute, a sister program to the Getty Museum, is doing a translation, currently scheduled for publication in Spring 2012. A staff member at the Getty Museum (getty.edu) told me that nothing has been translated at this point.

    Do any of you have access to a translation of the how-to-do-it chapter? Even a rough, approximate translation would be of assistance. I hope that this doesn't ruffle too many feathers regarding copyright issues.

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