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  1. #1

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    Cyanotype On Glass - 1st try...

    I thought I'd try a cyanotype on glass; this only came about as I wanted to try pouring emulsion on to glass after subbing it with gelatin. In the end, I had some cyanotype solution left over from some printing and figured I use that instead of the standard emulsion.

    Unfortunately, I didn't have any chrome alum, and I only had food grade gelatin, but as this was just a practice piece I figured I'd have a go anyway! Here's the result from that experiment...



    I've since ordered some photographic-grade gelatin and chrome alum, and the experiment was successful enough to make me want to do some more experimentation. I've also subbed a glass plate with some arrowroot instead of gelatin, to see what happens with that.

    Has anyone else had experience of cyanotype on glass?

    Cheers,
    David.
    Creative Image Maker e-magazine is back! Find out more at http://creativeimagemaker.blogspot.com

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    I always wanted to try that and never got to it. You've beat me to it, and all the power to you. My idea was to protect it with another sheet of glass and put the whole think into a backlit frame. I has already selected the frame for it:

    http://www.photoglow.com/wall.htm
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  3. #3

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    That's a neat idea - I'd got as far as thinking about selecting a picture frame, printing on to the glass and sticking the glass back into the frame with white card behind it!
    Creative Image Maker e-magazine is back! Find out more at http://creativeimagemaker.blogspot.com

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  4. #4
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vickersdc View Post
    That's a neat idea - I'd got as far as thinking about selecting a picture frame, printing on to the glass and sticking the glass back into the frame with white card behind it!
    A high-end solution would be a a suspended frame by Halbe. The glass would appear to float inside of a classic frame, having some depth.

    http://halbe-rahmen.de/en/main/produkte/distanz.html
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  5. #5

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    I looked at that link, but I'm not quite sure that I 'get it'. It's a deep frame, with glass at the front edge, but the actual picture is set back, away from the glass (unlike a normal picture frame)... is that right?

    Doesn't seem that hard to make if that's the case (out of wood at any rate). Hmmm, food for thought...
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  6. #6
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    My idea was to protect it with another sheet of glass and put the whole think into a backlit frame.
    I would like to put it into an actual wooden window frame.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  7. #7

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    As long as you've got a suitable negative to fit the window frame, then why not. Sounds like a great project. Imagine a front / back door with multiple panes of glass - each one could have a separate cyanotype image.
    Creative Image Maker e-magazine is back! Find out more at http://creativeimagemaker.blogspot.com

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  8. #8

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    David,

    I have made a few tests on glass, but nothing really large yet. I have now found a UK source of formaldehyde so I plan to have another go, but with decent hardening of the of base-layer. I have used potassium alum in the past and although it usually works, I have had a few images slip off the glass and down the sink. Formaldehyde is nasty though and a bit 'Damien Hirst'.

    Best regards,

    Evan

  9. #9

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    Hi Evan,

    Have you received the supplies from the taxidermists? I hope you report your findings after using formaldehyde - for now, I'll stick with the chrome alum! Is the potassium alum better for working with glass than chrome alum?

    Cheers,
    David.
    PS: I've done you a print and the arrowroot has dried on the hand-made paper, so I should be sending you those this weekend.
    Creative Image Maker e-magazine is back! Find out more at http://creativeimagemaker.blogspot.com

    Thank you.

  10. #10

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    (this is what i know about the alums and i'm no expert nor chemist. so reader beware)

    as far as i know the potassium alum hardens the gelatin LESS than the chrome alum. this is sometimes preferable, for example in doing a certain technique in carbon printing. so the c.a. is what you'd usually want.
    one caveat: i've read that the alums take longer to harden the gelatin than the aldehydes (which harden immediately, or close to that). so, the general advice is to let the substrate coated with the alum-hardened gelatin dry and harden for one or two days.
    you will find more info on the alums and aldehydes in the alt. photo mailing list archives and i some of sandy king's writings in various places (that' where i got most of my info on the alums)

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