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  1. #1

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    Grainier looking lith

    Hello,

    I've been doing lith printing for a short while. I've both of Tim Rudman's books and I've been looking through what information I can find online as well.

    I'm using Fomatone VC RC and Easylith and have found them a lovely combination, lots of colour but not so much the graininess effect. Is there a factor I can focus on such as chemical ratios that will produce a grainier look with this paper and developer combination? I quite like the amount of colour I get with this and would like to keep that. Or would I be better to look at other papers? I've been using them quite dilute, 20ml A/20 B/1000 H2O at 68F.

    Thanks,
    Dana

  2. #2
    Mark Fisher's Avatar
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    Try other papers. The chemicals do have an effect, but secondary to the paper in my experience. There are 2 available that I've used with serious grain. Slavich Unibrom is grainy and controllable....but with occasional quality problems Fomabrom VC is seriously grainy and has a very particular look and is hard to control. Do a flickr search for lith and the paper names and you'll see examples. They are not very colorful, though. Another that I use (from my freezer stock!) is Kentmere Warmtone VC. It is more colorful and still grainy....and sadly discontinued. Some may still be available, though.

  3. #3
    SuzanneR's Avatar
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    You might also add texture by printing through, say, tissue paper or cheesecloth. Just lay it right down on top of the paper in the easel, and see what happens!

  4. #4
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Easylith in general gives a pretty fine grain, it seems. The most pronounced grain I have gotten with any combination of paper and developer is Fomabrom 112 and Arista Powder Lith (from Freestyle in California).
    Ilford MGWT and Slavich G4 gives a fairly grainy appearance also.
    If you use negatives of moderate to high density and you have to expose for a long time, you can get some interesting grain that way.

    Attached picture is Fomabrom and Aristalith, subsequently toned in sepia and selenium.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Signs.jpg  
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

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  5. #5

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    General observation: less sodium sulfite, more grain. To the point of pepper fogging. I am not familiar with your developer, so I do not know what is in there to begin with.

  6. #6

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    Thanks, I'll look at some of those papers. I'll just have to experiment a bit more with the chemistry too. I've only just started to vary the developer ratios. 2 to 1 A to B seems to have a small effect, little more grain, little less colour.

  7. #7
    MVNelson's Avatar
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    the others are correct .... grain is by far more the paper than the chemistry.
    Miles :
    cherish light



 

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