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  1. #21

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    I prefer the gold-thiourea gold toner Loris mentioned to others. I use it one-shot and discard, about 25ml per 20X25 cm paper and tone for a minimum of ten minutes. This gives a very deep brown/blue tone in the shadows.

    Like all of the iron processes vandyke is quite paper sensitve in terms of IDamx, and some papers that have worked great for me with palladium and kallitype give low Dmax with vandyke, COT 320 the best example.

    I always double coat, using a 1/2 strength solution for the first coat, and apply the second coat as soon as the first is dry to the touch. If nothing else the first coat adds some humidity to the paper, which is a good thing. I also expose the paper very soon after coating, say 10-15 minutes after drying with a fan.

    It will also help Dmax, maybe, to humidify the paper before coating.

    Sandy King

  2. #22

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    It may just be the scan. Comparing the step wedge to a cyanotype step wedge, I believe I get slightly less Dmax on the Van Dyke print, but looking at the print I posted compared to a cyanotype of the same image, the tree on the left looks pretty "black" (blue or brown) on both of those. I got the materials for the gold-thiourea toner, so I'll use that this weekend. At some point I may experiment with other paper too, but the Rives BFK is what I can get easily locally, and I do like the look.

  3. #23
    MVNelson's Avatar
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    it seems to me that , at least compared to kallitype , VDB give a bit less Dmax naturally. Also, an alkaline fixer like TF-4 or TF-3 may tend to enhance the tonality some .
    Miles :
    cherish light

  4. #24
    Guillaume Zuili's Avatar
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    You can get great Dmax. Less control than kallitype for sure but you can play. For example with the delay at which you expose your paper after it's dry. Completely different contrast and color if it's soon or later. After seeing Miles's kallitypes, TF-4 is also an option worth trying.
    Part of the magic (and madness) of these processes... it's endless with so many variables...
    Humidity, quality of water, paper, and if the gods are with you on that day !
    :-)

  5. #25

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    Well, the gold-thiourea was quite successful; it gave a nice neutral grey all over the print. I'm attaching scans of two prints I did today. Now all I have to do is work out what do with the rest of the 0.2% gold chloride solution I have, since the gold-thiourea uses 1%. Thanks for the help everyone!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Scan-100502-0001.jpg   Scan-100502-0002.jpg  

  6. #26
    MVNelson's Avatar
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    SingerB, those are very nice prints and congratulations on nailing down the gold toning to your pleasure... I understand the sort of high key rendition you are after and I like that too. I also note that it is impossible to get the full sense of what the actual print is like "in hand". However, I notice that the left column on the building on the right is just shy of enough print density to see it's white margins distinct from the background on my screen. I am sure that it gets lost in the scan. A note ... with VDB/kallitype I believe that the ability to go for the highlights aggressively is one of this process's strongest benefits. The useful highlight tonal range is long and beautiful. Getting creamy smooth distinct tonality in that range is well within the possibilities ... You're doing good stuff here and because I'm a fan of the process I guess I'm just trying to be encouraging ... looking forward to seeing more from you ...
    Miles :
    cherish light

  7. #27

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    Thanks MVNelson. The scan is actually representing that fairly well; even on the print seeing the left edge of that building is very hard (although it is there). I actually did two prints of that today, and gave the second one more exposure to try and bring out some more highlight/midtone detail. However, it didn't appear to be enough to fully distinguish that edge. It doesn't help that there's a cloud right there, rather than open sky, making the tonalities very close. I used that scene because I've printed it before with the Cyanotype process, so I have some idea of what it can look like. This time, though, I agree that the other print is the more successful. Thanks for the encouragement, and I'm definitely going to keep working with this process.

  8. #28

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    Good work singerb, congrats.

  9. #29

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    BTW, you can still use your 0.2% gold chloride, just work out how much dry gold chloride you need (in the gold-thiourea toner formula) or compare concentrations/proportions and use the 0.2% solution appropriately; basic stuff really.

    For instance, if the final volume of toner calls for 12.5ml of 1% gold chloride, you can substitute it with 1% / 0.2% (makes 5) x 12.5ml = 62.5ml of 0.2% gold chloride... (5x the volume, since your 0.2% gold chloride contains 5x less gold compared to a 1% solution.) You'll just have to add less water to make up final volume... (And also prepare an intermediate tartaric acid solution with less volume, in order to not exceed the final toner volume when all the intermediate solutions are mixed together.)
    Last edited by Loris Medici; 05-03-2010 at 10:39 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Added an example...

  10. #30

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    Of course - it's been too long since high school chemistry. I was thinking of how to convert a 0.2% solution into a 1% solution, but naturally, it's not the quantity of solution, but the quantity of gold chloride (and tartaric acid, etc). I should be able to just reduce the water required by 50 ml to compensate for the extra 50 ml in the gold solution. Thanks for pointing out the obvious! Wonder if I still have my chemistry book(s) somewhere...might be useful!

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