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  1. #11
    keithwms's Avatar
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    IR shot to film and IR digital are quite different. The sensitivity ranges are very different, and that gives quite different effects. I much prefer the look of IR film. For one thing, film retains the highlight tonality so you don't wind up with completely whited out leaves on trees. And with digital, especially the older bodies you mention, it's very easy to blow out the highlights. Also, if perchance you like halation, that is not something you will get with digital. You'd have to post process it or something to get that.

    Shooting IR film is really not that hard, you should simply not expect perfection with the first roll. The good thing about 35mm is that you have a lot of exposures on a roll and can bracket liberally, with ease.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  2. #12
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    How much does a Digital conversion cost? Around $500……that’s quite a bit of film, even if you are fooling around with it.

    Regardless, I am curiously watching this thread. I like the info that has been given. Might be enough for me to even give it a try (with film)

  3. #13
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    Lowrider S10.

    If you can find the right filter for it, your Ansco Anscoset might work really well with IR film.

    A hand meter would be an advantage though.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  4. #14

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    Speaking of light meter, anyone has ever tried this thing for IR photography?
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...VZY6E2VQPDQD1H

    Nathan

  5. #15
    sly
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    I've got IR film in the freezer. Want some? PM sent

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by MFstooges View Post
    Speaking of light meter, anyone has ever tried this thing for IR photography?
    That thing measures a completely different range of IR. As usefull for IR photography as a meter that meters UV light.

  7. #17
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    How does weather effect IR image, does a heavy cloud day make foliage look different than a sunny day? What the "best" condition to shoot IR in

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by SMBooth View Post
    How does weather effect IR image, does a heavy cloud day make foliage look different than a sunny day? What the "best" condition to shoot IR in
    Although IR films appear to clear haze, best results will be on days when there isn't so much and when the sunlight is direct on the subject. So you need to look out for high clouds, which do scatter IR and reduce the amount of IR light reaching the leaves. We have to remember that the light responsible for Wood effect has to come down all the way through the atmosphere ands then reflect off the subject. So the ground haze between us and the subject is only half of the issue.

    [N.b. Mie scattering appears the dominant mechanism relevant to IR]

    Clouds can look nice in IR because the surrounding sky tends to go very deep, but you mustn't have complete clouding with today's IR films, their sensitivity extends only to 850 nm or so and they won't deliver much of anything in shade. (HIE delivered quite strong Wood effect in the shade, but alas it is no more)

    The proportion of IR light changes through the daytime, and I can tell you that mornings and late afternoons rarely yield a successful IR photograph.

    A *lot* depends on your light and the filter you use. I usually use a deep #87 filter and longish exposures of a few seconds. And the prime IR months for me, in my area, are April, May and June. Before that there isn't much foliage, and after that there is too much haze. I sometimes like the film in the fall again, when humidity drops.

    Of course, if you don't have good light outdoors then all is not lost... indoor IR portraiture is very possible and does some interesting things with skin tones (they tend to look porcelain). There was time when it seemed every rocker had to have an IR portrait. Try it! On my site, I think I posted examples of IR and a UV portrait on the same subject, done in tree shade, to show how differently they render the skin. IR looks very nice, UV looks hideous and leathery!

    As always, just experiment and find out what works for you!
    Last edited by keithwms; 06-15-2010 at 08:00 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  9. #19
    keithwms's Avatar
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    P.S. I found the links: IR, and UV.

    I was testing for focus shift using an apo lens, the IR film and deep fileter, hence the swing and shallow DOF.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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