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  1. #11

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    robert -

    call rockland colloid and ask for bob.
    he was very helpful when i had trouble, maybe he
    can help you troubleshoot.

    his # is : 1-845 359-5559.

    good luck!

    -john

  2. #12
    Stan. L-B's Avatar
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    It has been some time since I was into making my own glass plates and emulsioning them; but I doubt if this technique has changed very much over the past fifty years!

    1. The use of glass for the support will need to be substratized, which as you will be aware is a form if sizing.

    Any alkyd colour, or plain based primer. A couple of coats of oil based polyurethane, which can be sprayed or painted may be used when a colour base is not required.

    Each type of support will require it's own method and materials, but the above will cover, glass, stone ceramics and some hard grain woods.

    The substrating must be thoughly dry, best left overnight, before the liquid emulsion is applied by spray brush or glass rod. It is important for the emulsion to be left for at least twenty -four hours before use. However do not leave it too long before using, as it will not keep it's sensitive properties well.

    There are a number of manufacturers for these emulsions and each specify their own method for application. The Black Magic of Cachet's allow you to add the hardener to the sizing solution which has a chrome alum effect, this will ensure quick and positive adhesion of the emulsion to the base support, in your case, the glass slides.

    The authority in the UK is Dr Mike Ware, a chemist who can be contacted on his site at, mikeware.demon.co.uk

    I hope I have renewed your confidence in the project, it is a fascinating procedure and well worth the effort. Your first real success will be retained in your memory for all time!
    'Determine on some course more than a wild exposure to each chance' The Bard.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stan. L-B
    It has been some time since I was into making my own glass plates and emulsioning them; but I doubt if this technique has changed very much over the past fifty years!

    1. The use of glass for the support will need to be substratized, which as you will be aware is a form if sizing.

    Any alkyd colour, or plain based primer. A couple of coats of oil based polyurethane, which can be sprayed or painted may be used when a colour base is not required.

    Each type of support will require it's own method and materials, but the above will cover, glass, stone ceramics and some hard grain woods.

    The substrating must be thoughly dry, best left overnight, before the liquid emulsion is applied by spray brush or glass rod. It is important for the emulsion to be left for at least twenty -four hours before use. However do not leave it too long before using, as it will not keep it's sensitive properties well.

    There are a number of manufacturers for these emulsions and each specify their own method for application. The Black Magic of Cachet's allow you to add the hardener to the sizing solution which has a chrome alum effect, this will ensure quick and positive adhesion of the emulsion to the base support, in your case, the glass slides.

    The authority in the UK is Dr Mike Ware, a chemist who can be contacted on his site at, mikeware.demon.co.uk

    I hope I have renewed your confidence in the project, it is a fascinating procedure and well worth the effort. Your first real success will be retained in your memory for all time!
    How about writing a short article Stan? Like Robert, I cannot find any infromation or details, other than the alternative photography article which uses liquid light. If you know of any other methods, I for one would welcome your expertise.

  4. #14

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    jorge

    there is a book called

    Silver Gelatin: A User's Guide to Liquid Photographic Emulsions

    it is pretty much the bible for using liquid silver emulsions ( and making emulsions too ). for a while it was out of print in the usa, and only avail. in the UK, but you can get it from amazon.com again.

    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...books&n=507846

    using polyurethane as a "binder" works well, but the problem is that it tends to yellow after a while.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian
    jorge

    there is a book called

    Silver Gelatin: A User's Guide to Liquid Photographic Emulsions

    it is pretty much the bible for using liquid silver emulsions ( and making emulsions too ). for a while it was out of print in the usa, and only avail. in the UK, but you can get it from amazon.com again.

    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...books&n=507846

    using polyurethane as a "binder" works well, but the problem is that it tends to yellow after a while.
    Thank you J for the info! I will get it now. I think Clay and Kerik are nuts trying the wet collodion method, wayyyy too hard, and cant see myself carrying 12x20 plates in the field, not in my little car... OTOH knowing the quality of their work I am sure some nice prints will come out of their efforts.

    in any case one must be prepared for eventualities....dry plate sounds good to me..

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jorge
    Thank you J for the info! I will get it now. I think Clay and Kerik are nuts trying the wet collodion method, wayyyy too hard, and cant see myself carrying 12x20 plates in the field, not in my little car... OTOH knowing the quality of their work I am sure some nice prints will come out of their efforts.

    in any case one must be prepared for eventualities....dry plate sounds good to me..

    jorge -

    the book is really good. it even has a section with formulae for emulsions &C ..
    you are forgetting one thing. with wet plate you have to develop the plate when you are still in the field in a portable darkroom
    as soon as the collodion has turned into celuloid, you've pretty much screwed the pooch <g>

    dry plates are a little easier, that is for sure -

  7. #17
    Stan. L-B's Avatar
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    Yes, SOME polyurethane will yellow with time but not all. The oil based variety is the best and should remain plain or colour stable.

    There is no substitute for trials in this field. Specific probems are not always easily settled through discussion, as there are so many variables which makes these processes so customized and fascinating. It is often difficult to make a second copy to match the original.

    I do not profess to be an authority, or even up to date with so called modern methods of alternative processes. There are excellent sources of information, both in book form and on line for any of the recognized methods.

    I know of four types of liquid emulsion that are available world wide:

    Formulight, (Silverprint VC)
    Rockland (Liquid Light)
    Bergger (EL3)
    Cachet (Black Magic)

    The Rockland is probably the most versatile and controllable as far as speed and density are concerned.

    Jorge.
    Thankyou for your proposal, but in my opinion the subject of alternative processes does not lend itself to a short article. I think the forum, for specific question and answers on the subject is the way forward, which is already well catered for on APUG.

    Stay enthused.
    'Determine on some course more than a wild exposure to each chance' The Bard.

  8. #18
    clay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian
    with wet plate you have to develop the plate when you are still in the field in a portable darkroom
    <g>
    I look at like an early version of Polaroid. You generally know what you have before you leave.

  9. #19

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    Clay,

    I am interested in learning wet plate also. Did you attend any workshops with John Coffer or the Ostermans? And are youmaking your own collodion?
    I have read that Merk (pharmacutical) makes a collodion that is suitable, but have also read that only by making your own can you get the results you need. If you are making your own I would be curious about where you are getting your materials for the collodion.
    "Fundamentally I think we need to rediscover a non-ironic world"
    Robert Adams

  10. #20
    Stan. L-B's Avatar
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    Robert.
    I failed to mention two other factors for getting the emulsion to stay with the support.
    Should the emulsion not be fresh, or if it has been stored at the wrong temp. then it will not dry in the time suggested. It is a bit similar to old paint, but with paint you can add a drying agent to speed it up.

    The other matter I failed to mention earlier is that the support, in this case glass, needs to be treated with alcohol, isopropyl, acetic acid or stop bath, or even white vinegar. After so treating, wash off with warm soda water which will remove any trace of wax or other surface that will be detrimental to the coating.
    'Determine on some course more than a wild exposure to each chance' The Bard.

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