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  1. #11
    donbga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loris Medici View Post
    Indeed, that could work - in order to increase dmax - also. But the "thing" with polyurethane and/or acrylic coatings is that you can exhibit the prints w/o glass; that's both good in terms of aesthetic and in terms of cost... You can wipe the surface with a moist (and clean) piece of cloth, "since the coating is impermeable". Therefore, there's definitely a potential in using such coatings - as long as you can live with the "unnatural" gloss.

    Regards,
    Loris.
    IMO, those type of coatings look like what they are - plastic. Not very pretty.
    Don Bryant

  2. #12

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    +1 on what Don said..but that's just my take.

    Like Kerik mentioned a layer of gum works-quite well IMHO
    Mike C

    Rambles

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by donbga View Post
    IMO, those type of coatings look like what they are - plastic. Not very pretty.
    I agree. Just dropped the practice for that reason.

    OTOH, it's not more ugly than exhibiting the print under glazing. In case of an exhibition, I may actually prefer these coatings (depending on the circumstances - not in every case!) instead of placing glazing in front of the image. Your prints look much more luminous when taking that route, and no glazing definitely cuts down costs - especially so if you would normally use high quality (so called museum grade) UV protecting / high transparency / anti-reflective (but w/o adding any texture!) glass...

    Regards,
    Loris.

  4. #14

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    There is a large variety of gel media, some matt, some gloss, and also matt and gloss varnishes. My limited experiments suggest that the effects when sprayed on could be useful but fairly subtle while providing the protection that Loris notes. Not the traditional look, but maybe suitable for some projects.

    Who knows, maybe we could get a Pt/Pd print to look like a "real giclee" print...

    Ben

  5. #15
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerik View Post
    I imagine trying to do wet plate in Scotland in December would be a huge challenge!
    Just about everything in Scotland is wet in December!


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  6. #16

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    Diluting Liquitex

    Does anybody know the proper dilution to get a 6% solution? I'm assuming it's 6 mL gel medium for every 94 mL distilled water and the techies at Liquitex seem to concur. Just want to make sure I'm doing it right before plunging in.

    Oh, and the author of the article that David cites is not Richard Sullivan but William Laven of www.platinotype.com fame. Just to set the record straight.

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