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  1. #11
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ntenny View Post
    It's been done successfully before:
    http://www.kpraslowicz.com/2009/11/2...n-olympus-xa2/

    I do intend to try it with a higher-output flash, though.

    -NT
    I am not really sure that he is getting much of an IR effect in those shots. Some black eyes and a little bit of glowing skin is all I see. There appears to be plenty of visible light exposing his film, as well as the IR and near IR.

    Also, read how close he has to be to his subjects to make the little flash work.

    Also, focus shift for different wavelengths definitely is an issue with both Ekfe and Rollei IR films, despite what he sez. Check out this link: http://www.digitaltruth.com/products...d_film_007.php.
    2F/2F

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  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    I am not really sure that he is getting much of an IR effect in those shots. Some black eyes and a little bit of glowing skin is all I see. There appears to be plenty of visible light exposing his film, as well as the IR and near IR.
    Hmm, they look to me fairly similar to what Weegee got with IR flash---no obvious screaming IR effects, but a little bit of the "zombie eyes" look. But it's not clear to me what circumstances he's shooting in---my plan is to do some controlled experiments in really dark circumstances and try to get a good understanding of what's going on.

    Also, focus shift for different wavelengths definitely is an issue with both Ekfe and Rollei IR films, despite what he sez.
    I don't think he disputes it, it's just that he's shooting with a scale-focus camera and relying on DOF to cover for focussing errors and shifts. I've done the same thing and gotten away with it.

    Also, shouldn't the focus shift depend more on the filter than the film?

    -NT
    Last edited by ntenny; 09-10-2010 at 10:06 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: nothing interesting
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  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    I am not really sure that he is getting much of an IR effect in those shots. Some black eyes and a little bit of glowing skin is all I see.
    The goal with my infrared experimenting wasn't about the Infrared Effect, but instead, to be able to shoot in situations where the unsuspecting subjects' pupils will be wide open without ruining their ability to see all night by blinding them with a full power flash. Trust me here, the SFX A covered flash is very, very, very, very, very, very dim compared to an unfiltered flash. Unless the subject is looking directly at my my camera, they are clueless. And ifthey are looking directly at it, they don't see a big blue spot for the rest of the night.

    Without Kodak HIE film available, I found that using 87 filter with SFX or Rollei IR film just doesn't work. For SFX and Rollei film you need a 72 filter. All my experimenting with the 87 ended in failure. Before I found some SFX-A filters to use, my original plan of action was to get some of the cheap Chinese 72 filters off eBay and grind them down to fit over my flash.
    Last edited by Sjixxxy; 09-11-2010 at 12:53 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: typo
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  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by ntenny View Post
    I don't think he disputes it, it's just that he's shooting with a scale-focus camera and relying on DOF to cover for focussing errors and shifts. I've done the same thing and gotten away with it.
    Exactly. I've been using this IR method for a little over a year now and focus shift included, just about all of what I shoot is acceptably sharp for my needs.

    Some are really on.



    And some are a little off.



    But here here is the deal. The ones which are a little off are still acceptable to me. I scale focus when I shoot with non IR film, and I scale focus with it. Both yield results that work. If you require absolute & perfect sharpness, then this style of shooting probably isn't right for you.

    I love it though and can't wait for Halloween--best damn IR shooting day of the year.

    ps: A larger collection of images I've made over the past year using this methodology can be found here.
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  5. #15
    bvy
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    Kip, someone on your blog suggested covering the flash with black garbage bag material. I'm curious to hear more about this or any other DIY solution from household or easily attainable materials.

    Like you, I'm interested in nighttime flash photography without blinding my subjects more than any classic infrared effect.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by bvy View Post
    Kip, someone on your blog suggested covering the flash with black garbage bag material. I'm curious to hear more about this or any other DIY solution from household or easily attainable materials.
    I haven't tried any DIY methods aside from the exposed E6 film. That didn't work well with the near-IR films that are easy to get. I just bought a bunch of of the SFX-A filters while they were available so I wouldn't run out anytime soon.

    I think the guy on my website used the trashbag to simulate an 87 filter, which probably won't get you very far unless you can track down some HIE film. I tried an 87 with the Efke Infrared film and it just wasn't fast enough to get results with a small strobe.
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  7. #17

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    Kip, glad you came along. I don't know why it didn't occur to me to think that the guy who did the IR-flash experiments would be on APUG...

    Quote Originally Posted by Sjixxxy View Post
    I think the guy on my website used the trashbag to simulate an 87 filter, which probably won't get you very far unless you can track down some HIE film. I tried an 87 with the Efke Infrared film and it just wasn't fast enough to get results with a small strobe.
    I've been looking into the filter options. Ilford indicate (in the data sheet for the SFX 200 film) that the SFX filter is similar to an 89B / R72, but it's not clear if they really mean "equivalent" (cutoff at 680 nm, 50% transmission at 720 nm). But it sounds at least plausible than the (expensive) 89B gel would work.

    Interestingly, http://www.msp.rmit.edu.au/Article_03/02c.html says that the combination of two Wratten primary-colour filters will make a working IR-pass filter, transmitting "relatively freely" from somewhere around 700 nm. That sounds promising to me, and the Lee primary-colour polyester filters aren't expensive---I'll probably try this combination first.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
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    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by ntenny View Post
    Interestingly, http://www.msp.rmit.edu.au/Article_03/02c.html says that the combination of two Wratten primary-colour filters will make a working IR-pass filter, transmitting "relatively freely" from somewhere around 700 nm. That sounds promising to me, and the Lee primary-colour polyester filters aren't expensive---I'll probably try this combination first.
    Definitely let me know how that works out for you. I get e=mails from time to time asking for alternatives to the SFX-A, would love be be able to actually provide one to those people.
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  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by blade_o View Post
    you can use blank (developed but unexposed) E6 film.
    I have used this method for several different and unmentionable things.

  10. #20
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    The mention of IR flashbulbs got me thinking and I found this comment over at RFF (http://www.rangefinderforum.com/foru...p/t-35227.html)

    "Weegee often used infrared bulbs, like for such things as taking photos of couples carrying on in theaters and such. From what I heard he made these by dipping ordinary flash bulbs in some kind of very deep red (infrared) dye. From what I remember from a thread on another system, these did emit a visible, but not obviously bright, deep red flash."

    Some flashbulb guns are very tiny. Not like the typical "40's press photographer" look; the Honeywell Tilt-a-Mite, among others, is the same size or smaller than most modern, hi-end strobes.

    Anyways, something to think about.... you'd have a lot of range with this method.
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