Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,504   Posts: 1,543,457   Online: 965
      
Page 1 of 6 123456 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 57
  1. #1
    bvy
    bvy is offline

    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Pittsburgh
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    869
    Images
    36

    Filter to make IR Flash

    I'm intersted in trying infrared flash photography. I want to use my Olympus XA2 or XA4 and A16 flash, and go out shooting in public at night. What sort of filter can I put over the flash? I read a blog post recently that suggested that I can use an Ilford SFX A filter. They were cheap, but Amazon has long since sold out of them, and I can't find them elsewhere.

    So I'm looking for some other inexpensive alternatives -- improvised ones if necessary. What kind of filter can I put over the flash? For lack of anything better, someone suggested that black trash bag material would work and even black electrical tape. Will it really?

    Thanks...

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    San Diego, CA, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,274
    Images
    21
    I'm looking into the same thing. So far I've found that Freestyle has gel filters equivalent to Wratten 87 and 87c for quite reasonable prices (US$26.99 for 4x4 inches). A gel 89b is available from Kodak (B&H has them, for instance) but it's expensive, north of US$60 for 3x3 and US$100 for 4x4.

    I can't figure out whether the SFX filter is equivalent to 89b or not.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Westminster, Maryland, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    1,504
    Very simple solution. You need to tape a polyester Wratten or Lee Infrared filter over your strobes lens.

    3 inch: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc..._Infrared.html

    4 inch: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...ra_Red_87.html

    Your Infrared film should see the IR strobe, but make sure you do testes before an important shoots.
    When I grow up, I want to be a photographer.

    http://www.walterpcalahan.com/Photography/index.html

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    San Diego, CA, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,274
    Images
    21
    Not to follow up to myself, but I did a little more poking around and found this promising article:
    http://amasci.com/amateur/irgoggl.html

    The author apparently has combined multiple layers of "Congo Blue" and "Primary Red" visible-light filters to get something that's visually opaque but passes IR from about 720 nm---basically the equivalent of an 89b. I'm going to have to try this.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  5. #5
    2F/2F's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,008
    Images
    4
    I am afraid that if you filtered the little flash on an XA, you'd have almost no light hitting your subject. I would suggest something that has more power.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Washington, the state
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,122
    Images
    16
    I think that you are about 40 years too late with this idea. Just get out your Speed Graphic and your Graflite and use some GE #5R flashbulbs with your infrared film.
    Dave

    "She's always out making pictures, She's always out making scenes.
    She's always out the window, When it comes to making Dreams.

    It's all mixed up, It's all mixed up, It's all mixed up."

    From It's All Mixed Up by The Cars

  7. #7
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,008
    Images
    65
    Yes, the flash must have IR output at an amount useful to you. After all, most flash units were designed to have maximum output in the visible range.

    There is some IR output from standard flash units. You can feel the heat on some. If you cannot feel heat when you test flash your strobe, then there is probably little or no IR output.

    PE

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    San Diego, CA, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,274
    Images
    21
    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    I am afraid that if you filtered the little flash on an XA, you'd have almost no light hitting your subject. I would suggest something that has more power.
    It's been done successfully before:
    http://www.kpraslowicz.com/2009/11/2...n-olympus-xa2/

    I do intend to try it with a higher-output flash, though.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Paddock Lake WI
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    8
    you can use blank (developed but unexposed) E6 film. 35mm if you have a small flash, or 120 if your flash is larger. Just take and attach two strips of either to the front of your flash and there you go IR filter. IDK about the actual spectral emission of using E6, but it has always worked good for a buddy of mine.

  10. #10
    Andy K's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Sunny Southend, England.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    9,422
    Images
    81
    I think using a flash with IR would be a waste of good IR film. Unless you want specific skin tones I see no reason to do this. Also at night you won't get the full IR 'effect' because there is no sunlight. You would be better off using an ordinary bw film, and saving the IR for daylight subjects. (IMO).


    -----------My Flickr-----------
    Anáil nathrach, ortha bháis is beatha, do chéal déanaimh.

Page 1 of 6 123456 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin