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  1. #31
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Amber is also a recognized color, as in the phrase "it was an amber colored wine" and etc.

    So, references are quite difficult in some cases, especially due to translation and transliteration problems.

    PE

  2. #32

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    You're quite right.

    But in the original post, the words archaeology, and coast were used, pointing towards the fossilized resin found on the south eastern Baltic coast.
    In that same post, it was suggested that that stuf was also found on the Dutch coast, from which assumption/bit of misinformation it was then inferred that the old masters, and even van Gogh, used the material in their work.

    The clues were all there.

  3. #33
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    Well, we may never know for sure!

    PE

  4. #34

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    Will we ever know anything for sure?

  5. #35

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    Errr, I think there are different terms in Turkish for silicone (silikon) and silicon (silisyum) and silica (silika) and silicate (silikat). Also, the Turkish equivalents of amber (kehribar) and ambergris (amber) are different too...

    Anyway, thanks for bringing this painting related issue into consideration Mustafa (as a gum printer, I'm always interested in painting technique...), and thanks Marco - for the clarifications...

    Regards,
    Loris.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Amber is also a recognized color, as in the phrase "it was an amber colored wine" and etc.

    So, references are quite difficult in some cases, especially due to translation and transliteration problems.

    PE
    You are right PE that definitions can be fluid and non-clear. Actually, it seems there is a multitude of terms being used for the different types of hardened resin used to create oil painting varnishes. Besides amber are dammar/damar, copal, mastic, rosin/colophonium and resin/gum terms often used and apparently intermingled, although in general, some of the terms are rather specific for a certain type of resin.

    As an general overview to be taken "with a pinch of salt":

    - Amber for fossilized hardened resin of often unclear origin
    - Copal generally seems to be a synonym for the term "amber" as described in the sentence above.
    - Dammar/Damar for resin from Dipterocarpaceae tropical trees from primarily India and Asia. This is a large family of different tree species (+/- 500 different species) belonging to the normal broad leaf flowering trees like oak, beech etc.
    - Mastic seems be hardened resin from a specific broad leaf evergreen shrub: Pistacia lentiscus
    - Rosin/colophonium for hardened resin extracted from pine trees.
    - Resin and gum seem synonym, and seem general terms for the fluid extracted from trees, both still in its fluid, as well as hardened state (the resin polymerizes, probably in combination with oxygen from the air)

    Again, the terms are often intermingled, and most of these resin types have other uses as well, for example in printing inks. In addition, chemically/synthetically created resins seem to have largely taken over the market for varnishes, probably both due to cost, and better characteristics (less yellowing, more robust).

    Marco
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  7. #37

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    I am not sure what you are talking about, but I am pretty sure that whatever it might be, it is off topic for the Website. I don't see the connection you are drawing between whatever it is you are talking about and photography when you say, "I think We like the pt pd process very much because its perfect underpainting and waits to be colored after the first print. This is a big sentence but I believe this." Perhaps The Lounge would have been a better place for this discussion.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  8. #38
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    Marco;

    We also have Balsamic Resin here (not to be confused with Balsamic Vinegar which cannot be used as a Stop Bath ).

    Balsamic Resin is a type of liquid sap on its way to becoming Amber. Frankincense is a type of Balsamic Resin and resembles Amber.

    PE

  9. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Balsamic Resin is a type of liquid sap on its way to becoming Amber. Frankincense is a type of Balsamic Resin and resembles Amber.
    But still very different things.

    Amber is fossilized conifer resin.
    Frankincense is fresh gum from a broad leaved shrub.
    Balsamic resins is a collective term for smelly 'saps', both from conifer and broad leaved plants.
    The only thing they really have in common is that they once where inside a living plant.

  10. #40
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    Another thing in common is that they can all turn into Ambers given enough time and the right environment. Frankincense most closely resembles Amber in appearance but being soft to the touch rather than hard IIRC. It has been a few years since I have handled any Frankincense.

    PE

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