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Thread: Posterization

  1. #11
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    I see where you are going but I think I cannot help you, all my work was on film and I am not sure how it translates onto ink.
    Would love to see your results , once you get further down your crazy path.
    I am setting up to do my solarazations this weekend , I just counted the steps/chemical /wash - 22 to completion , so your pain is my pain.

    Bob
    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    Hello,

    Thanks for the replies.

    The final product will be an ink print done with screen stencils. I have studied a bit on the posterization process that is performed to make silver prints. It involves making a series of exposures from an original negative or positive, and processing them in a halftone developer (A/B). Then contacts are made to give you an opposite set. When you sandwich each pos/neg set, you, of course, get nothing but black. However, when you offset the second series from the first, you have transparent areas. Each offset sandwich is assigned a color or tone, and rephotographed in registration to make a single posterized negative from which the print is made. Filters are used when rephotographing to assign the colors for color prints, and neutral density is used when rephotographing to assign the tones in black and white prints.

    With light alone creating the various densities on the copy neg, it is, of course, necessary to provide a clean separation between each color or tone. Thus, the offset sandwiches would seem to be a necessity. However, since I will be contact printing the lithos onto screen emulsions, doing a separate screen for each layer of ink, and using opaque inks, it would seem that if I print my lightest tones first, the purposes of making the offset sandwiches would be reduced to 1) using less ink (since the lighter colors would require a lot of it if not using the offset sandwiches to expose the screens), and 2) making the overall thickness of the ink on the paper uniform.

    So, what I am really wondering is if I am right, and the offset sandwiching is not really necessary for layer-at-a-time ink print printed from lightest to darkest. Also, if I am right, and the print can be made without using sandwiches, I am also wondering if I should go ahead and use them anyhow for any particular reasons other than the two I mentioned above. The exactness of registration it would require when inking the prints might not be attainable with my current "rickety" work station. Using more ink and printing over lighter colors seems like it could help me cover the slop. Making a perfect edge match with a screen is extremely difficult due to the flexibility of the screens. Usually a slight overlap or "trap" is used where two tones or colors meet.

    Boy, do computer users have it easy!

  2. #12
    richard ide's Avatar
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    One thing you should consider when making your final positives for screen burning is to spread some of the images. I am sure I have read information on APUG but the method is easy. You expose your negative/positive with clear film between them and a diffuser such as matte surface drawing film on top. Use an increased exposure and the positive image will be larger than the negative. I have done spreads by contact with as much as 1/4" spread for large film for printing on difficult surfaces.
    Richard

    Why are there no speaker jacks on a stereo camera?

  3. #13
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    We used a device called a Micro Modifier, much like a nuark plate burner which gave precise spreads and chokes. But as Richard states you will need to spread the film and then still re register for multiple printing.


    richard- got the strosser punch in US of A, give me a call.

    Quote Originally Posted by richard ide View Post
    One thing you should consider when making your final positives for screen burning is to spread some of the images. I am sure I have read information on APUG but the method is easy. You expose your negative/positive with clear film between them and a diffuser such as matte surface drawing film on top. Use an increased exposure and the positive image will be larger than the negative. I have done spreads by contact with as much as 1/4" spread for large film for printing on difficult surfaces.

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