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  1. #21
    dpurdy's Avatar
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    http://www.apug.org/gallery1/showima...&cutoffdate=-1
    I posted this last week in the apug gallery, it shows the affect and it is definitely just a lighting technique.. enhanced by compensating developer.
    Dennis

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by erikg View Post
    Motion picture Double x is not the same film as the old Super Double X, although it is a pretty decent camera film. I've shot a few hundred feet of it over the years, reminds me of Tri-X from the 70's. Super xx sheet film is gone, but other quality sheet films still exist. I like to live in the present, it's all we got.
    Just to echo this; a quick search indicates Super XX 35mm cine film was coded as 5232 and no longer exists. Double-X is 5222.
    i can't wait to take a picture of my thumb with this beautiful camera.

    - phirehouse, after buying a camera in the classifieds

  3. #23
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    The lighting technique appears to be what Mortensen calls "contour" lighting in his book Pictorial Lighting.

    In short, you put the light closer to the subject than your camera, and shadows are cast around the edges. If the camera was in the same spot as the light everything would appear evenly illuminated, but move back and you start to see the shadows around the edges where the light can't reach.

    Does this sound about right?

  4. #24
    Robert Hall's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dpurdy View Post
    http://www.apug.org/gallery1/showima...&cutoffdate=-1
    I posted this last week in the apug gallery, it shows the affect and it is definitely just a lighting technique.. enhanced by compensating developer.
    Dennis

    Great effect Dennis,

    Would you care to elaborate on your lighting and development?
    Robert Hall
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    Technology is not a panacea. It alone will not move your art forward. Only through developing your own aesthetic - free from the tools that create it - can you find new dimension to your work.

  5. #25
    dpurdy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Hall View Post
    Great effect Dennis,

    Would you care to elaborate on your lighting and development?
    It is as holmburgers is describing. If you have the light closer to the subject than the camera and the light is centrally located then the camera can see the fall off of the light on the edges. If you were to bring the light back behind the camera and keep it in the center the fall off on the sides would be much less. For that picture I was using a Rollei T with 75mm lens and hand holding a studio strobe enough above the camera to keep the light out of the picture. Probably had some diffuse material on the light to keep from blasting the model too harshly. I always called that lighting technique rim light.
    Dennis

  6. #26
    Robert Hall's Avatar
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    Thanks for sharing. It looks like a good thing to try next time I'm in the studio.
    Robert Hall
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    Technology is not a panacea. It alone will not move your art forward. Only through developing your own aesthetic - free from the tools that create it - can you find new dimension to your work.

  7. #27

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    The second photograph is listed at edward-weston.com as being from 1927 and I believe is of Bertha in his Glendale studio, right?

    I can't find reference to the camera used for that series but I had thought it was his graflex and that he enlarged negatives from it using a soft focus lens. I know that he is supposed to have used this process with his commercial portraiture during that time period. I note that the shadows seem to "glow" and that is what I would expect from such technique. Most of the talk about lighting has been about the Charis photo, does anyone know if I am mistaken with regard to the second photo?

  8. #28

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    The photograph is of the dancer Bertha Wadell taken by Weston in 1927. It is one of a series taken over a three month period from March to June of that year.

    The initial photos in the series were taken with his 8x10 camera. Subsequent sittings utilized the Graflex (3 1/4 x 4 1/4)) and were contact printed. Therefore, there are both 8x10 prints and smaller prints from this series. The lighting was from directly behind the camera.

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Hall View Post
    Thanks for sharing. It looks like a good thing to try next time I'm in the studio.
    Ditto, just gave me a few ideas for my next shoot.
    5x7 Eastman-Kodak kit / B+M 135mm Zeiss Tessar + Compur Deckel
    RB67 Pro S /50 4.5 / 90 3.8 / 180 4.5 / WLF / prism finder / polaback
    FED-2 / 50 2.8 Industar 26m / 85 f2 Jupiter-9
    Canon 300v / A2

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