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  1. #1
    paulie's Avatar
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    cartridge paper for van dyke brown

    having used a multitude of different cotton papers and enjoying the experience , although a expensive one.

    i decided to buy a large sheet of 300gsm cartridge paper, very white , flat surface and cheap 1 pound.

    wasn't expecting a great showing from this paper, swelling maybe,blotches possibly, strange coating behavior or maybe unusual coloration. what the hell ill give it a go.

    i applied two generous coatings of gelatin 4% coated with a high quality brush, temp of gel was 60 c approx, so quite hot.

    allowed to dry off naturally and finished with hair dryer.

    sensitized using a soft brush, first coat allowed to dry then a 10 sec blast from hair dryer, second coat of sensitizer , followed by a 1m 30 hair dryer on each side.

    made test strips in same manor 45 second hair dryer on each side

    i added a -10% exposure compensation to the print time due to moisture level compared to test strip.(moisture speeds up exposure, and as the test strip is likely to be dryer than larger sheet , well you get my point, 10% was perfect)

    all i can say is wow, beautiful, smooth coating, nice neutral brown tone, great contrast. and the most important thing a ice white finish to the paper.

    why am i writing all this, well because if you haven't slummed it in the cartridge paper world then do so , you wont regret it.
    Last edited by paulie; 11-20-2010 at 06:06 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #2
    Jerevan's Avatar
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    I think the success may have to do with the gelatine coating you did. Always great when things turn out and on the cheap, too!
    “Do your work, then step back. The only path to serenity.” - Lao Tzu

  3. #3

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    In any case, if you want stable prints that will last; use pure cotton, acid and OB free art papers. Many so called cartridge papers will yellow and become brittle with age...

  4. #4
    paulie's Avatar
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    I think the success may have to do with the gelatin coating you did. Always great when things turn out and on the cheap, too!
    yeah my original intention was to use a dicromate hardened layer of gelatinn ,i will try that next and also a albumen size

    In any case, if you want stable prints that will last; use pure cotton, acid and OB free art papers. Many so called cartridge papers will yellow and become brittle with age..
    yeah i realise the archival problems, but as i dont tone my prints i suppose thats the least of my worries, if i want a archival print i use carbon transfer, as for yellowing it will take some years for the yellowing to be as dramatic as cotton is when fresh.

    i consider my vandykes to be pleasure and not business

    i will update this thread if the prints destroy themselves or spontaneously combust or alike

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by paulie View Post
    ...
    i will update this thread if the prints destroy themselves or spontaneously combust or alike
    Ok, then we aren't going to hear anything from you (about this issue) before a couple of years... OTOH, I predict it won't take more than a couple of years - especially so if you weren't extra careful / fastidious in processing.

    Regards,
    Loris.

  6. #6
    Akki14's Avatar
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    I've used cheap paper for cyanotype. Cyanotype prefers acidic conditions. My first cyanotype prints done... 3 years ago and haven't spontaneously combusted either :P
    ~Heather
    oooh shiny!
    http://www.stargazy.org/

  7. #7
    paulie's Avatar
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    Ok, then we aren't going to hear anything from you (about this issue) before a couple of years... OTOH, I predict it won't take more than a couple of years - especially so if you weren't extra careful / fastidious in processing.

    Regards,
    Loris.
    for sure, my processing is pretty firm, im sure the vdb's will fade pretty well anyway without a noble metal, i like the temporary nature of the alt iron process, it just fades away into eternity , like us humans lol

  8. #8
    paulie's Avatar
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    I've used cheap paper for cyanotype. Cyanotype prefers acidic conditions. My first cyanotype prints done... 3 years ago and haven't spontaneously combusted either :P
    thats good to know :0)

    i just bought another two sheets today so ill be printing away like a over excited kid . and just for a few pennies a print

  9. #9
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    > use pure cotton, acid and OB free art papers

    Acid free - the inference by me is that a buffered paper may be good. Perhaps a pH neutral paper would be best or actually for iron processes an acidic pH maybe yeild best performance.
    Don Bryant

  10. #10

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    Nope, acid free simply / plainly means acid free (that wasn't a figurative expression), "buffered" is not equivalent to "acid free" to me...

    Regards,
    Loris



 

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