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  1. #11

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    +1 on cyanotype for the first layer
    Mike C

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  2. #12
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    In this case, I didn't want the blue as the first layer, rather as a top layer applied to only certain areas of the image. I'm also not a huge cyanotype fan to begin with as to get a good cyanotype, you've got to tailor your negative to the process which means it doesn't print well in platinum, which is my preferred go-to process (not that it would give me a blue layer).

  3. #13

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    Hi, I'm a little late to this thread, but a couple of thoughts: you don't say, but it looks like you're doing a gumover process. There's no "best blue" for gum printing; it just depends on what you want to do. There are a couple of blues that I would consider "not best" for straight gum printing: cerulean and cobalt, as they are both very weak pigments and won't give a gum print the tonal structure it needs. But if your tonal structure is established by an underlying platinum print, then even these might be useful, in the right amount.

    I'm surprised the French ultramarine didn't give you a good blue, which makes me think you must be using your pigments quite diluted. Ultramarine is a fairly unsaturated (hue-wise) blue, on the red side; I used to use it a lot for tricolor gum printing because I liked the muted palette it gave. Phtalo is a very strong blue; it's garish to my eyes, but a lot of people like it. The "Winsor blue" mentioned above is a pthalo. For some time now my very favorite blue pigment has been Prussian. You have to watch the brands, because some are very permanent and some aren't; you can check handprint for the details. I love it because it's a lovely transparent blue that makes nice color blends when overlaid in a tricolor gum print and also makes a lovely overlay, or mixed with a little black, a nice monochrome. There's no other blue I would use as a monochrome. Hope any of that is helpful,

  4. #14
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    Katherine-

    thanks for the input. In some cases I am doing gumover. In the case of the two images posted earlier in the thread, they are pure gum, being done with a single negative, so I'm printing with an eye toward creative use of selective color, not verisimilitude. The image with the blue layer, for example, in the original scene the background walls are just gray, not blue and red. I think if I were to try this layer again, I'd try a Winsor Blue (red) with some neutral tint mixed in to darken it so it isn't quite so neon. It's an interesting image to me, in that it has a bit of a 19th century hand-tinted albumen print feel to it, which wasn't quite what I was aiming for, but an interesting effect nonetheless.

  5. #15

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    Okay, I didn't look closely enough; I could have sworn that first one was a gumover. Carry on.... you're doing fine. That's one of the nifty things about gum, especially when learning, is that sometimes you get something you hadn't planned on, but that you find you like better than what you'd planned. At least that's the way I found it to be. Enjoy,
    Katharine

  6. #16
    Ole
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    From a chemists' viewpoint, "Prussian blue" is identical to what gives cyanotypes their colour. No surprise to me that Prussian Blue has been recommended if a cyanotype base layer for some reason isn't right!
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

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