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  1. #11
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    The "matrix" was either lifted off and laminated to a paper support, or the image itself was transferred to a paper support. I have done both.

    PE

  2. #12
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  3. #13
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    In the Google Books reference, look below the right elbow of the painter and you see the box of Flexichrome dyes. I still have a usable set. They are very nice dyes and the process was amenable to many alterations to yield both slides and prints. Omission of the bleach step left a heavier dark image, increasing contrast and density.

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  4. #14

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    Lovely prints

    As I understand it, Flexicolor was used in advertising, when colour artwork was always reflection copy. It allows a b&w image to be made into a colour one in a much more convincing way than tinting a sepia bromide print. I have used the Flexichrome dyes to retouch Ektacolor Commercial fibre base prints. They were in tiny screw top white glass jars like mascara, and were soft and waxy, like shoe cream. You applied them with a Q-Tip.

    B.t.w. Ektaflex came out in the early 1980s and was a 10X8 inch colour print material. I printed off 5X4 neg onto a kind of black opaque plastic film. Development was done in a very simple hand cranked machine that passed the film and receiving paper through an alkaline solution and squeegee rollers. After a set time, darkroom lights could go on and the pack be peeled apart. Polaroid sued, because they'd patented every conceivable combination of peeling, transfering and receiving sheet; so the process was withdrawn. I still have a large number of 10X8 prints, and they're one of the most lovely photographic processes I ever used.

  5. #15
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    I worked on Ektaflex C and R materials. I have a collection of comparison prints with these two and Ciba/Ilfochrome, Radiance, Ektacolor and other color papers.

    PE

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