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  1. #1

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    tri color images ..

    i know it is possible to make tri color images
    from pan film, but is it possible doing this sort of thing
    with photo paper as a negative, or hand coated glass plates (liquid light emulsion ) ?

    if not, what were people like sergei prokudin-gorskii using
    if they weren't using pan film ?

    thanks for your help / suggestions !
    john
    im empty, good luck

  2. #2
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Print paper sees blue, or green, or blue and green [variable grade paper]. Print paper does not see red.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  3. #3

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    i realize this steve that is why i am asking ...
    it seems that before "pan film" was widely available
    that there were people doing tri-color images ..
    maybe i am wrong ?

    http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~dellaert/aligned/

    im not sure when exactly panchromatic film became available
    but i think it was after 1904-1915 ...
    im empty, good luck

  4. #4
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    Maxwell achieved color by accident and without really having a panchromatic film.

    However, pan films were available before your dates John, IIRC, using chlorophyll as the red sensitizer.

    PE

  5. #5
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post

    im not sure when exactly panchromatic film became available
    but i think it was after 1904-1915 ...
    Panchromatic films date from just before Prokudin-Gorskii, 1908 saw their widespread introduction & use.

    The British manufacturer Wratten & Wainright were one of the leaders in this field and had one of the best Research teams around, so George Eastman bought them as part of his getting Mees & Sheppard to work for Kodak. Kodak's two major Research facilities Rochester & Harrow were led and partially staffed by former Wratten employees.

    Ian

  6. #6
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Let us not start flame wars about "that tri-color thingie", if you get my drift [Insert wink here]. Magenta is a color and for completeness so is maroon.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  7. #7
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Steve, I'm currently doing a bit of research into Reversal processing for someone on APUG but actually by a request elsewhere, a different website .

    What's surprising is that B&W reversal processing only becomes commercial with the introduction of Panchromatic films. The reason is quite simple it's used for Tricolour screen processes.

    Ian

  8. #8

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    ron and ian + steve

    lots of knowledge here on apug !

    thanks !

    john
    im empty, good luck



 

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