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  1. #11

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    I've read time and time again that Buxton paper is the best. I just took a look at the Berrger COT 320, and the price is reasonable. If I see some examples printed on it, I may invest in some.

    I'll be doing some controlled tests later today or tomorrow on Arches to see how different variables effect my prints. I did some rough tests yesterday, such as acidifying the paper beforehand, and had varying results, but I was just playing about and didn't record what I was doing. I'll pick up a foam brush in a couple of hours also.

    Beautiful print, by the way.

  2. #12

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    Buxton is a wonderful paper for iron-silver (and just about anything else, I expect). It is a bit harder to coat than, for example, Arches Platine, but not terrible and the results are fantastic.

    One thing to remember is that, unlike emulsion based processes, the paper for liquid chemistry is just another piece of the overall chemistry.

  3. #13

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    The paper seems to be the variable that makes the most difference to the overall print here. It's really interesting to me, especially coming from a watercolour painting background.

    I just took a look on the Ruscombe Mill website, and there's a brand new paper called Herschel. It has been developed by Mike Ware as a speciality paper iron-based prints, just like Buxton. I'm tempted to buy a few sheets of that, and a few sheets of the Buxton if my wallet allows it.

  4. #14

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    The Herschel looks amazing (on spec). I have some on the way, but it was announced last week. If I were you, ordering paper, I'd try to get some of each. One thing, Dr. Ware knows what he wants in a paper.

  5. #15
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    An excellent paper to learn on is Beinfang 360 (or maybe it is "was", see below). It is a thin very pure vellum-like paper, comes in pads, is cheap, and has no issues. It is easy to coat with the cheapest of foam brushes. The downside is that it isn't easy to use in sizes above 11x14 as it can be hard to handle without tearing.

    50 sheets of 9x12 for $8...
    http://www.dickblick.com/products/bi...0-marker-paper

    Example: http://www.apug.org/gallery1/showimage.php?i=37365

    Later edit: scanning the comments on the Dick Blick site it seems the paper has been changed and reports are that it is inconsistent and 'not what it used to be' (but then it never was). My stock dates to the mid 80's when I used for proofing with a Calcomp pen plotter.
    Last edited by Nicholas Lindan; 04-07-2011 at 08:04 AM. Click to view previous post history.
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  6. #16

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    How do people find coating with a foam brush compared to a glass rod? Is there more wastage? I picked some up earlier and I'm eager to put them to use tomorrow.

  7. #17
    Barry S's Avatar
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    If the coating material is cheap (like cyanotype), foam brushes do a great job. They coat nicely, but do suck up a lot of extra emulsion. I just started using a Richeson 9010 brush for Pt/Pd printing and was struck by how little emulsion is needed with the brush. Considering the steep increase in the price of silver, I'm going to buy more 9010 brushes for other processes.

  8. #18

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    Cyanotype Papers

    I use the Ware New Cyanotype and have had success with the arches A hot press, lenox, Strathmore Bristol, Rising Bristol, Stonehenge, COT320, I brush coat all of these, rod coating will give a gritty look on some of these papers. I have also used the Arches, Cot320, for Argyrotype, this process is very sensitve to chloramines in the wash water, and I use only distilled water for processing.

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