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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by David William White View Post
    Before you do anything though, set them up and photograph them with colour film. You can reproduce them from there and hang them on the wall.
    GREAT IDEA!

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by aaronmichael View Post
    Thanks John, I suppose I'll just have to keep my solargraph images locked up in a black box somewhere. Then it turns into "What's the point of having them in there if you can't take them out and show them to people?" - hahah.
    " and this image was a solargraph showing the arc of the sun and my home "

  3. #23
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    Making it more wide angle...

    Figured I'd post back on here before starting a new thread. A lot the curves at the top of my image got cut off and when summer solstice comes around, i'm planning on putting up a bunch of different solargraph cameras and leaving them for half a year. I was just wondering, how would I make my pinhole camera more wide angle in order to capture a full 6 months worth of arcs? The pinhole camera I used for the image I posted was a soup can with a focal length of 73mm, a height of 4.5 inches, and my pinhole was placed behind a 5mm hole in the can.

  4. #24
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    Simple, just decrease the focal length. Use a can with a smaller diameter, like a tomato-paste can.

    I think of focal length like this; if you're standing 10 feet from a window, looking outside, you see a fairly limited view of the outdoor scene. This represents a long lens. But if your face is pressed right up against the glass you can see a great deal more, nearly 180°, this represents a wide angle lens.

    If you've ever been in a camera obscura room and held a piece of tracing paper up to the virtual image, you can see that by being closer to the aperture you get a very wide angle view of what's outside.
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  5. #25
    aaronmichael's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by holmburgers View Post
    Simple, just decrease the focal length. Use a can with a smaller diameter, like a tomato-paste can.

    I think of focal length like this; if you're standing 10 feet from a window, looking outside, you see a fairly limited view of the outdoor scene. This represents a long lens. But if your face is pressed right up against the glass you can see a great deal more, nearly 180°, this represents a wide angle lens.

    If you've ever been in a camera obscura room and held a piece of tracing paper up to the virtual image, you can see that by being closer to the aperture you get a very wide angle view of what's outside.
    That's the answer I was afraid of. I suppose what I should have asked is, is there any way to keep the camera wide angle while still being able to use a large sheet of photographic paper. I'd like to be able to scan and print my images out to 16 inches wide or larger and I think that I'm going to start to lose a lot of quality if my negative is small. From what it sounds like though, there's no way to have both of what I want.

  6. #26
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    Well, at least not with a smaller can I guess. Plus, something I hadn't considered, since you'd be decreasing formats you might end up getting the exact same angle of view; seeing as the geometry of the can hasn't changed, just the scale.

    Also, as you go wider, your light falloff will get worse at the corners. Doesn't having a curved film plane help this?

    Let's see... you need something durable enough to be outside for that much time, and it needs to be the right focal length... sounds like a trip to the grocery store is in the works!
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

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