Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,283   Posts: 1,535,019   Online: 1074
      
Page 14 of 17 FirstFirst ... 4891011121314151617 LastLast
Results 131 to 140 of 162
  1. #131
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    22,972
    Images
    65
    Drew;

    Had you ever considered these options?

    1. As particle size decreases, transparency goes up!

    2. Metallized dye complexes are transparent. You form the "pigment" in situ by reaction with a metal salt.

    PE

  2. #132

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,572
    Precisely, Ron. The point is, that folks making advanced pigments don't have any real incentive to make process
    colors. I'm sure I could take something already available in industrial scale and turn out a reasonably balanced
    carbon print, probably just as good as any pigment set currently being used, but not anywhere near the hypothetical ideal. A co-worker of mine invested in metal pigments early on, got nervous, so sold his shares off
    early. He still made enought to put his kids thru college; but then the technology took off big scale and he realized he could have retired on it if he had waited another year or two! There is also for remarkable pigment
    work developed in Europe. None of this has anything to do with inkjet needs. I'm talking about primary pigments,
    not lakes or tiny dyed particles. The permanence potential with problems from preservatives or glycols is out
    there. I just don't have any time at the moment to experiment. I need to get my inventory of more ordinary color
    prints built up again before I can fool around with either dye transfer printing or something wholly experimental.
    Another area where fresh thinking could begin regards actual tissue sensitization with involve neither dichromates nor diazo technique. That can be found in medical patents related to gelatin and collagen. But so
    far, everything I've encountered looks either too complex or too toxic to recommend to any home darkroom worker. It would take a trained chemist with appropriate professional facilities. And absolutely none of this would
    have any realistic profit potential. Nobody cares what a carbon print is nowadays other than another printmaker.

  3. #133
    MDR
    MDR is offline
    MDR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Austria
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,056
    I have yet to try it but the Shiba process doesn't look to complicated and can create "three color gums" or "three color carbon tissue" without the use of dichromates. Quiet a few photographers I know would love to see a comeback of the dye transfer. Some smaller pigment mills in Europe, especially in the Czech Republic might be interested in creating a niche product.

    Dominik

  4. #134

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,572
    Doninik - dye transfer matrix film has already had three custom runs in Europe. My freezer is full of the last of the Ekfe batch, and allegedly the film made in Germany is better per dust control, but that all went to one user
    in Germany who exposes it via blue laser, but otherwise processes it traditionally. I'm personally working in more an advanced tweak of the older wash-off relief technique, totally analog, but so far getting very promising test results, but still haven't had time to do serious personal printing this way. The whole problem with alternative
    printers is that they naturally want to experiment in all kinds of different directions, so it's quite difficult to pool
    buying power into any one category. Dye transfer would be easy to revive if there were enough younger workers
    willing to spend the time and money. But it does require a fair amount of elbow room if one wishes to make larger
    prints. Commercially it will never compete with inkjet. You've got to want to do it for personal reason, or for the
    superior look of certain specific colors. But my goal is not to replicate it but actually improve it in certain respects. I can confidently state that I've found better ways to make separation negatives than in the heyday
    of the process, without even resorting to digital negs, and have also figured out better ways to develop the
    matrices. Other folks are exploring ways of improving dyes and mordants.

  5. #135

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,572
    But this jogs my memory, since Ron you are a member of the dye transfer forum too, and have the
    necessary background in film science. And here the holy grail of matrice film per se would be something with a straighter toe and better highlight control, which has always been a shortcoming
    of the process. I'm going to mess with developer tweaks to do this, and still have a lot of Tech Pan
    8x10 on hand if old school highlight masking is still required. But rethinking the matrix film itself might
    be in order. Jim's formula and Efke etc is pretty much a replication of traditional Kodak film.

  6. #136
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    22,972
    Images
    65
    I just talked to Jim a few days ago about this. I would have to defer to Jim for posting anything he feels comfortable discussing here on the forum. My work has gone in a different direction, namely very high speed emulsions with advanced sensitization. Maybe that will be in Volume 2 of my book.

    As you say, Matrix film has a very definite set of requirements. They can be compatible with ordinary films but need not be.

    PE

  7. #137
    CMB
    CMB is offline

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Santa Cruz, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    87

    Adam Bartos Exhibit

    The Tom Gitterman Gallery (New York) exhibition of Adam Bartos photographs will feature 9 color carbon prints made by Tod Gangler. The opening reception is Wednesday February 29th and Tod will be there - so if you are in town, here's your chance to talk shop with a master of the process.

    http://gittermangallery.com/html/exh...sp?exnum=20652
    Last edited by CMB; 02-27-2012 at 01:12 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #138
    holmburgers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Rochester NY (native KS)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,418
    Images
    2
    Just found a great supplier of all things pigment. http://www.kremerpigments.com/shopus/index.php?lang=ENG

    There are a LOT of interesting pigments on this website, which should appeal to anyone who's into carbon or gum printing. The nice thing is that they appear to be easily bought, that is, like internet buying should be! (not some roundabout rigmarole of requesting a quote, meeting minimum quantities, requesting a sample, etc.)

    Here are the UltraStable pigments in aqueous dispersions. They can also be bought raw and as studio pigments, but this just seemed too convenient not to mention.

    PB 15:3 , PR 122 , PY 184

  9. #139

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Shooter
    Digital Negs
    Posts
    40
    hi, these are indeed excellent. I did my first tri-color diazostilbene carbons with them

    kees

  10. #140
    CMB
    CMB is offline

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Santa Cruz, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    87
    Quote Originally Posted by keesbran View Post
    I did my first tri-color diazostilbene carbons with them

    kees
    I am quite pleased to learn that you have had some success making tri-color diazostilbene carbons. Could you share some info (or even a foto or two) on your procedures? What kind of separation negative (con-tone/half-tone - silver/inkjet) are you using?

    Best,

    Charles



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin