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  1. #11
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Hello Sly! I am back from the hinterlands and limited internet. After the workshop, I photographed at Dry Falls, then over to Spokane for a week -- splitting firewood, bucking hay out the fields and into the barns, digging a 8 foot deep hole to repair a leak in the water supply line from the well/pump and a whole bunch of other fun stuff.

    You wrote: "The last 2 prints the glop stuck to the film, and a portion of the image stayed there, leaving a blank, white patch on the paper."

    That is the usual sign of an over-exposed print. The tissue has been hardened all the way down to the tissue support material, and that part of the image stays with the tissue support. In this case, there is no layer of unexposed gelatin between the image and the tissue support to melt and allow one to completely separate the tissue support from the final support.

    Was there a significant exposure difference between the first 3 processed and the last ones?

    I suppose one would see the same effect with tissue that sponataneously hardened, but I do not see where that would come in from your methods. One thing that will cause the tissue to harden and difficult to separate is excessive heat during exposure. The glass should not be hot to the touch - warm is okay. The time span of your process (6 or so hours) was not excessive, as I normally go double that...as long as the sensitized tissue was stored sensibly, which I am sure you did.

    The fixed-out RC should be fine and dandy for transfer. I have used fixer with and without hardener on fiber paper and saw not difference in the handling processing or final results. I generally do not use hardener in order to aid washing the paper. Gelatin tends to harden on its own over time, thus it might be a moot point (I tend to fix out a large batch of paper at a time, so it is around for awhile before I use it).

    Thick, homemade tissue is a whole different beast from the B&S tissue. What works for one may not hold true with the other. You could try increasing the time in the transfer path, if you continue to have trouble separating the tissue support. You will know you have gone too far when you start to get filling around the edges of the image (the edges of the image float off the final support.

    You could also let the transfer bath water warm up to 60F and go with the same over-all time. That should allow for a little more water absorption (I figure it was 50F, not 50C that you transferred in ).

    Unfortunately, I do not remember anyone having problems with frilling during the workshop. Dang lazy students...expecting the instructor to make all the mistakes for them! LOL!

    Good luck!

    Vaughn
    Last edited by Vaughn; 07-10-2011 at 12:54 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  2. #12
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    How about using non-fixed out RC (or fiber) paper? It doesn't seem like that should change anything, but perhaps there is an excess of hardener present in the paper that needs to be washed out.

    I used this for some tissues, since it doesn't really matter if the tissue paper goes dark or not.
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  3. #13
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    If the paper isn't fixed it will discolor in time.

  4. #14
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    Which wouldn't be a problem for a tissue.
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  5. #15
    Hexavalent's Avatar
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    How about using non-fixed out RC (or fiber) paper? It doesn't seem like that should change anything, but perhaps there is an excess of hardener present in the paper that needs to be washed out.
    I'd be inclined to fix and wash paper - silver halides and other goodies may react with the dichromate sensitizer (think carbro).
    - Ian

  6. #16
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    Ahh, right! I now remember hearing this ere. How quickly I forget some things..
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  7. #17
    sly
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn View Post
    You wrote: "The last 2 prints the glop stuck to the film, and a portion of the image stayed there, leaving a blank, white patch on the paper."

    That is the usual sign of an over-exposed print. The tissue has been hardened all the way down to the tissue support material, and that part of the image stays with the tissue support. In this case, there is no layer of unexposed gelatin between the image and the tissue support to melt and allow one to completely separate the tissue support from the final support.

    Was there a significant exposure difference between the first 3 processed and the last ones?

    Vaughn
    Well, the short answer is yes. The 2 shortest exposures separated well. 2 that were exposed for the middle (same) length of time had one failure and one success. The longest exposure also failed. The puzzling thing is that 2 days before I had used this same lengthy exposure time for 2 prints, which both separated fine. One of the failed prints was the same neg, same exposure time. Worked fine one day, didn't separate at all 2 days later.

    Maybe I wasn't wearing the right socks or had my tongue stuck out of the left side of my mouth.

  8. #18
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    And my thick tissues make it a real chore to actually expose down to the base!

    I believe there was left-over sensitized tissue from the workshop -- did any get mixed up with the unsensitized? Spontaneous hardening over that period of time would certainly give the results you were experiencing. If the good and bad prints came from the same big sheet of tissue, that would blow that theory!
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  9. #19
    sly
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    I used up the last of the tissue I brought home last night. Got one reasonable print.

    The longest exposure was as long as the ones that wouldn't peel last time, but this time I used a fan, took a bit longer in the transfer bath, and waited longer (5 min) before trying to peel. None of them refused to separate.

    Here's the best from last night.

    I'm about to go camping for a couple of days. Hope the rain stops and I'm able to take some shots that I can overdevelop for carbon prints.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Englishman River.jpg  

  10. #20
    Andrew O'Neill's Avatar
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    Glad that one worked out for you. It's absolutely pouring rain here.. has been since last night, non-stop.

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