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  1. #11
    puderse's Avatar
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    Try again

    I've made hundreds (thousands?) of cyanotypes here in Texas. Enlarged onto high contrast neg or pos film up to 24X36 and contact print in the sunlight. My wife is a quilter and she incorperates them into quilts and sells them to others as well.

    Wash the cloth well and rinse well with a little acetic acid the last time. Water quality matters. It's an acid-base thing. Same goes for washing the finished project.

    In the dark: mix and put your chemistry (Fotographers Formulary kits and bulk chemicals) in a big tray. Remember it's poison. Put the cloth (any all-natural fabric) and soak up the chemical. Add additional pre-cut (torn) pieces until all the chemistry is soaked up. Painting the chemistry may not put enough chemistry in the cloth. Roller sqeegie on a big sheet of plate glass so that the excess drains into the tray. Keep going untill all the chemistry is used. Hang up in the dark until dry. Store in a good paper box and use within a week. (You are going to make a mess, strong soap will clean up after the lights are on)

    Synthetic blend fabric will not work. All silk, cotton, linen, etc. 100% white cotton sheets are cheap at garage sales.

    Never tried to do paper!

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by puderse View Post
    I've made hundreds (thousands?) of cyanotypes here in Texas. Enlarged onto high contrast neg or pos film up to 24X36 and contact print in the sunlight. My wife is a quilter and she incorperates them into quilts and sells them to others as well.

    Wash the cloth well and rinse well with a little acetic acid the last time. Water quality matters. It's an acid-base thing. Same goes for washing the finished project.

    In the dark: mix and put your chemistry (Fotographers Formulary kits and bulk chemicals) in a big tray. Remember it's poison. Put the cloth (any all-natural fabric) and soak up the chemical. Add additional pre-cut (torn) pieces until all the chemistry is soaked up. Painting the chemistry may not put enough chemistry in the cloth. Roller sqeegie on a big sheet of plate glass so that the excess drains into the tray. Keep going untill all the chemistry is used. Hang up in the dark until dry. Store in a good paper box and use within a week. (You are going to make a mess, strong soap will clean up after the lights are on)

    Synthetic blend fabric will not work. All silk, cotton, linen, etc. 100% white cotton sheets are cheap at garage sales.

    Never tried to do paper!
    So you're printing the quilting squares before sewing. Not printing the finished quilt. Do I read this correct?

    MB
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  3. #13
    puderse's Avatar
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    quilt pieces

    How in the world would you print on a quilt? Try to lift a soaking wet quilt out of the washing machine!

    Anything you can get onto a litho neg can be printed on natural fabric and put into a quilt.

    This is all from the '70s. Today they just print on fabric with a copy machine.

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