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  1. #11
    Neanderman's Avatar
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    I have a lathe. Using the back gears I'd bet I could wind them pretty tight and consistently. I'd guess copper wire (easy to find in #10 size) would not be usable due to the ion exchange issue. Wood would make an okay core, but with a lot of use, the swelling/shrinking cycle would be problematic. I guess ideally you'd use 316 stainless for both the wire and the core.

    Ed
    "I only wanted Uncle Vern standing by his new car (a Hudson) on a clear day. I got him and the car. I also got a bit of Aunt Mary's laundry, and Beau Jack, the dog, peeing on a fence, and a row of potted tuberous begonias on the porch and 78 trees and a million pebbles in the driveway and more. It's a generous medium, photography." -- Lee Friedlander

  2. #12
    Leigh B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neanderman View Post
    I guess ideally you'd use 316 stainless for both the wire and the core.
    I think alloy 410 or 430 would be better options for this application.

    A 1-pound (34-foot) spool of 0.105" (10 AWG) in 410 is $18.47, while 430 is $17.24 at McMaster-Carr www.mcmaster.com

    Both are bendable (soft temper) and matte finish.

    - Leigh

  3. #13
    Neanderman's Avatar
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    Leigh, thanks for that info!
    "I only wanted Uncle Vern standing by his new car (a Hudson) on a clear day. I got him and the car. I also got a bit of Aunt Mary's laundry, and Beau Jack, the dog, peeing on a fence, and a row of potted tuberous begonias on the porch and 78 trees and a million pebbles in the driveway and more. It's a generous medium, photography." -- Lee Friedlander

  4. #14

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    Check out the Carbon Transfer Group onYahoo Groups. We recently did a Group order for rods SD Specialties for . I useThemnow for coating subbing on glass and for coating silver-halide emulsions on glass.
    Bill

  5. #15

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    What do the RD rods go for...?

  6. #16
    vyshemirsky's Avatar
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    Those rods are not expensive, actually. About $40 for a 36" formed one. Wire wound must be even cheaper. Mine arrived yesterday and are a piece of art themselves. Thanks to Sandy for organising a group order.

  7. #17
    mdm
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    There is a setup fee to pay which roughly doubles the cost, if you order only one rod. In my case, on the group order, not having to pay the set up fee paid for my shipping. I think the idea is that you use a high % gelatine with a RD200 to get a thicker tissue and a low % for thinner tissue or for sizing paper. I tried winding my own rod but was not happy with the result. Usually I pour 1.6mm deep with magnetic strips but extra thick tissue is a major hassle to dry, difficult to use and not necessary for reasonable relief anyway.

    David
    Last edited by mdm; 07-21-2011 at 03:47 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by holmburgers View Post
    This was new to me, but these coating rods are elegantly simple in their functionality. A rod is wound with a wire, and the diameter of the wire is directly proportional to the coating thickness. A definite volume of a liquid emulsion is pushed into the valleys between the circular wires and as it passes, these liquid peaks spread out and make a very even coating.
    The good news actually is, you needn't run for one of those special Mayer bars. A simple threaded rod (something like this: http://www.allmetricsmallparts.com/p...rdwarerods.htm) might do the job at least as good...

  9. #19
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Stay away from mild steel, copper, aluminum and wood. Any non-magnetic stainless steel is probably ok.

    PE

  10. #20
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    Wow, thanks everyone for all the input.

    Neanderman, a lathe would probably be perfect for winding one of these.

    And I am surprised at the price of the RD bars; that's really not bad at all. One of the lab sized ones would probably suit my purposes; they can coat up to 12".

    When I first saw that video I actually thought it was a simple threaded rod and I went to the hardware store to check it out. The problem however, is that these threaded rods are very coarse and have many imperfections which would likely lead to scratches. The wound-wire makes for a lot of smooth surface area and a way to tightly regulate the coating thickness.
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

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