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  1. #21
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    and so is Vaughn's tissue really 73 mils thick? Dang...
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  2. #22

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    Yep...but that's wet thickness. I use a recipe similar to Vaughn's (and the same coverage rate), and I just measured a dry tissue (at least as dry as it gets in the NW right now), and it's 8.5 mil dry thickness.

  3. #23
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Depending on solids content, wet / dry = about 10 / 1 in thickness. This is close enough for our purposes as long as you can repeat your work.

    PE

  4. #24
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    Greg, are you measuring with a pair of calipers? I don't know if my pair are accurate to thous (I like that word...)

    So, for 8.0 mil dry thickness, based off of PE's formula, you would need a rod with 0000 gauge wire, 11.7mm diameter.
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by holmburgers View Post
    ...
    So, for 8.0 mil dry thickness, based off of PE's formula, you would need a rod with 0000 gauge wire, 11.7mm diameter.
    Which is why, for me, it is so easy just to pour the glop on the tissue support and help it a little with a finger to spread across the whole sheet. It is as easy and fast as in the video, if one includes the time to prepare and clean the rod.


    mdm -- there is nothing reasonable about the relief I get...

    Vaughn
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  6. #26
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    So I take it the idea is to have a bar with a winding that is a bit wider than the width of what you're coating, plus handles on both ends? So, for say 8x10, you'd want it 9 (or 11) inches plus say 2 x 5 inches for 19 to 21 inches, total length?
    "I only wanted Uncle Vern standing by his new car (a Hudson) on a clear day. I got him and the car. I also got a bit of Aunt Mary's laundry, and Beau Jack, the dog, peeing on a fence, and a row of potted tuberous begonias on the porch and 78 trees and a million pebbles in the driveway and more. It's a generous medium, photography." -- Lee Friedlander

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by holmburgers View Post
    Greg, are you measuring with a pair of calipers? I don't know if my pair are accurate to thous (I like that word...)

    Yeah...the face of my dial calipers are marked in 0.001", and it was about half way between 0.008" and 0.009".

    I don't think a coating rod is appropriate for wet thicknesses like that. I don't think the RD rods go much above about a 20 mil wet thickness, which is a good thickness for more heavily-pigmented carbon tissue, or color tissues (perhaps even too thick for color...).

    For reference the B&S gelatin + substrate thickness is only about 0.009-0.010.

    Quote Originally Posted by holmburgers View Post
    So, for 8.0 mil dry thickness, based off of PE's formula, you would need a rod with 0000 gauge wire, 11.7mm diameter.
    That's not so much wire as rod stock. Good luck winding that around anything...

    --Greg

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by holmburgers View Post
    When I first saw that video I actually thought it was a simple threaded rod and I went to the hardware store to check it out. The problem however, is that these threaded rods are very coarse and have many imperfections which would likely lead to scratches.
    Yes, that's true for large diameter threaded rods. Not so for thinner rods (say, <5mm). By the way, they're also available in various plastic materials - see http://www.fastenercomponents.com/threaded-rod.php

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by holmburgers View Post
    The problem however, is that these threaded rods are very coarse and have many imperfections which would likely lead to scratches.
    Use a precision Acme threaded rod. The thread form is better suited to this application since it does not have a sharp peak, and the rods are very finely polished. They're available in stainless steel, and don't cost much more than regular all-thread.

    Check availability at McMaster-Carr www.mcmaster.com for folks in the US.

    - Leigh

  10. #30
    mdm
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn View Post

    mdm -- there is nothing reasonable about the relief I get...

    Vaughn
    I have spent the morning coating with a RD 200. It is very quick and easy to clean up, you just pop it back into its water filled gutter pipe and its ready to go next time. The tissue sets very quickly and can be moved very soon after pouring. It dries super fast, mine is already leathery after an hour in the cupboard with a dehumidifier. A normal threaded rod should work fine, at first I thought that is what I should have done, but the profile is different to a threaded rod, something that is much more noticeable on a RD95, and I am glad to have them. A threaded rod will be much harder to keep clean,if that deep valley fills with pigment or glop and once it dries you have a problem.

    A rod is nice for sizing paper, even if you dont use it for tissue. Of course if you only use photopaper then you have no reason to size paper.

    Thick tissue works fine but its more work at every stage, often a bitch to seperate. Also aparrently many high relief prints at George Eastman House are in bad shape, even in the Tod Gangler videos he mentions how they can crack where there is a change of relief. I decided that when I make a nice print one day it will last, but I do miss the relief sometimes, its the thing people notice about prints.

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