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  1. #41
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    These are excellent but messy! You can waste a lot of emulsion.

    PE

  2. #42
    CMB
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    ..or you can just get a threaded rod at Home Depot and adjust the % solids to get the desired thickness.

  3. #43
    mdm
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    The advantages of threaded rods increases as the size of the tissue poured increases. A 20 inch rod is convenient for A3 or slightly larger pours. A 40 inch is a little harder to use uniformly but still makes large tissue pours really easy. A 12 inch rod may not be all that useful next to any other method of pouring, such as spreading with a comb or with hands, except they help to disperse bubbles quite well. Wasting a little glop is really no problem, you can just scrape it up and reuse it anyway. I use a 20 inch and a 40 inch RD200 with 12.5% gel for tissue and a 20 inch RD95 with 10% gel for sizing paper, only because those were the sizes in the group order that happened last year. The 40 inch allows me to effectivly pour 4 A3 sheets in 1 pour, a great time saver, and the smaller rod makes it easy to pour smaller sheets each with different tones or colours. A fairly coarse threaded rod should work fine as CMB suggests. Some people seem to prefer a hollow hot water filled pipe with magnetic strips to hold it up, that works ok too. Overall though, a threaded rod seems to be best at ferreting out the air bubbles and the simplest clean up.

  4. #44
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    The threaded rod scares me because they're all very rough looking (gnarly). Specifically I'm wanting a rod more like your RD95 for getting a thin coating, for sizing and carbon-matrix pouring. Comb is working great, but this option is just so appealing.

    Shipping is less than $10, most LAB rods (12") are under $25, and there's no minimum or set-up fee and most are in stock ready to ship. That's $35 for a precision & purpose-built instrument of the highest quality. I'm happy to give them my money for this.

  5. #45
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    Home Depot has threaded rods here. They can be sanded down a bit and the oil can be washed off. Might be useful, IDK. At least you can see them!

    PE

  6. #46
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    I agree it'd be worth exploring, but if time is money, buying one of these calibrated meyer rods might actually be cheaper.

    Plus you'd have to experiment to find the right coating thickness with a threaded rod. But I have to say, if I were to ever need big sizes I'd be headin' straight for Home Depot!

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