Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,568   Posts: 1,573,488   Online: 820
      
Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 31 to 34 of 34
  1. #31

    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    59
    I just came across this post. Thanks for posting the article. It was a good read. I'm becoming competent with monochrome. Ultimately I will "graduate" to 3-color carbon. I don't want to deal with production of non-supercoated bromide paper. The print will be very small, which eliminates the need for pin registration. Small prints can be registered visually. 3-color, as I will use contone separations. They're capable of producing a good black without the need for a 4th black printer. The process is time consuming enough with plenty of places to fail with 3 colors as it is. Also, with contone separations and the double transfer process as Nadeau calls it (actually a triple transfer process) - you get the amazing three dimensional print. Nadeau told me he has not seen a 4-color print from screened negatives that have the 3 dimensional look - physical relief, where the blacks are raised above the print surface. Nadeau did tell me to get moving now while the film suitable for separations is still available! If you're ever at the Center for Creative Photography, ask to see Luis Nadeau's 3-color carbons. You'll be blown away: richness, saturation and physical relief. Best of all, the prints won't be behind glass. They show you the naked prints up close. No touching.
    Last edited by ciocc; 01-31-2012 at 04:46 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Spelling

  2. #32
    Philippe Berger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Belgium
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    65
    Hi,
    I would like to make cyan, magenta and yellow carbon.
    I have a cyan acetate, magenta acetate and yellow acetate acetate.
    I would like to be the double transfer of each separate color on the final watercolor paper.
    t there are a precise technique for identifying covered by each of the images on each other.
    Thank you for your advice and your help

  3. #33
    CMB
    CMB is offline

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Santa Cruz, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    89
    On Double Transfer


    A "temporary support paper" is used to combine the three separate color layers . This is a thin, high wet strength paper that has been coated with unhardened gelatin. First, the temporary support paper and the cyan layer are soaked in cold water and combined. When dry, the plastic support will peel off the paper leaving the cyan pigment image on the temporary support. Next, the temporary support is re-soaked along with the magenta layer and combined in register (this is the difficult part). When dried, the temporary support paper, which now contains the cyan and magenta image layers, is soaked again along with the Yellow layer and combined, registered and dried as before.


    A sheet of "Final Support Paper", coated with a thick, hardened layer of gelatin, is then soaked in hot water and combined with the temporary support paper (which has once more been soaked in cold water). Allowed to dry for 10-30 minutes, the sandwich is then placed in warm water and the temporary support is peeled away leaving a beautiful multi-color carbon pigment print.


    All this can be found in many books, but it will be necessary to modify the details of time, temperature and technique to reflect the unique characteristics of the materials being used.

  4. #34
    Philippe Berger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Belgium
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    65
    Thank you very mutch for the information on the double transfer

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin