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  1. #1

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    Cyanotype lifespan

    Hello!

    I was wondering if a cyanotype would last up to 10,000 years in a light tight, oxygen free environment? Time capsule you see.

  2. #2
    edp
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    "Up to" 10,000 years, in the same way that my internet connection is "up to" 20Mb.

  3. #3
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    No, there is no way to guarantee that...

    "Up to 10,000 years" means the same as "Less than 10,000 years."
    There is an outside chance it might last for more than 10,000 years, so the answer is 'no'.

    * * *

    On a more serious note: the life will be limited by the life of the substrate - the paper or whatever the cyanotype is made on. If made on a ceramic tile there is every chance it will last "10,000 years or more." The cyanotype pigment - "Prussian Blue" - is very stable.

    Papyrus has been shown to last several thousand years in dry conditions.
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  4. #4
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    I know they'll last more than 100 years.
    http://digitalgallery.nypl.org/nypld...97&total=1&e=w

    I love the process.

  5. #5
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    I found a book at the library from the late 1800's with some cyanotypes/blueprints inside it. They were absolutely immaculate.
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  6. #6

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    I once did a cyanotype on the sidewalk. It lasted about 8 months. I don't know if it ws sun fade or it it washed off, but it was a lot less permanent than my experience with cyano on paper.

  7. #7

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    In say "up to" Because I was considering a tiered approach, IE 100 years, 500, 1,000, 5,000, and 10,000 years. I figure by the time the next capsule opens, all the artifacts frome the previous will have been lost.

    I was also wondering, what causes paper to turn yellow and brittle?

  8. #8
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    I think traditionally the answer to that is acid... and cyanotype prefers acidic (or neutral) conditions so maybe it's not the best thing for a 10,000 year old photo.
    I think the Long Now project was looking at carbon printing on metal?
    ~Heather
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  9. #9
    Akki14's Avatar
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    And I'll second that i've seen very old cyanotypes, some Anna Atkins ones up close.
    ~Heather
    oooh shiny!
    http://www.stargazy.org/

  10. #10

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    The cyanotype likely will, but the standard substrates used will not: cloth, paper, etc. Try making one on stone if you want it to last 10,000 years.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

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