Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,901   Posts: 1,584,440   Online: 882
      
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 35
  1. #21
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    İstanbul - Türkiye
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,965
    Images
    108
    Of course it works. As you know as engineer , rapid manufacturing of mold business use that technology with epoxy.
    Material Cast Composite from England is the inventor of this technology and they print stereolithograpkically %40 ceramic powder and % 60 epoxy mixture with laser , layer on layer when epoxy was curing with laser light and than take the printed mass , fire the epoxy in reduction environment and than sinter the ceramic and create a sponge like ceramic part. Than they melt copper and when the ceramic part touches the molten copper , copper elavates in the sponge and cover the all holes.
    This technology is using by the F1 Society to create replacable liners for the pistons. There is no other technology better than this.
    F1 , now uses linerless engine blocks and I dont know how the rechnology of this company reacts.
    I have a British Patent Application printed at the Offical Gazette to use electric current and man made hybrid powder structures for
    to create engine blocks like a Turkish Rug within few minutes.

    Umut

  2. #22
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    İstanbul - Türkiye
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,965
    Images
    108
    Hello ,

    If you interested in enamel processes and print with glass and metal powders and plates - immortal print - you have to visit this site :
    http://www.glass-on-metal.com/pastart/index.htm
    Fused Photographs in Enamel:
    The Ceramic Tissue Method
    by James Doran
    from Volume 13, No. 3, April 1994
    Prior to the nineteenth century, portraits and portrait miniatures in enamel, were pretty much the exclusive indulgence of the aristocracy. Then came the Industrial Revolution, and with it, social upheaval and the dreaded Middle Class, whose consumer demands, even then, were insatiable. In the last half of the nineteenth century, photography, in its frenzied adolescence, offered a reasonable facsimile to traditional portraiture at a price that satisfied the throngs. Then, as if to answer some Bourgeois cry for enamel miniatures, a process emerged whereby photographic portraits of loved ones could be immortalized in enamel. These were not fuzzy reproductions like those seen in old newspapers, but were exquisitely detailed, subtly shaded, genuine photographic prints fused permanently onto enamel (or onto porcelain and glass, for that matter).

    Best ,

    Mustafa Umut Sarac

  3. #23
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    İstanbul - Türkiye
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,965
    Images
    108
    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum42/9...ing-glass.html

    there is lots of information on enameling at above thread.

    Umut

  4. #24
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    İstanbul - Türkiye
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,965
    Images
    108
    Vitreous enamel n. A glass coating fired on metal

    A vitreous enamel surface finish is achieved by fusing glass particles to sheet metal or cast iron by firing it at a temperature in excess of 800°C. This results in a surface that is incredibly hardwearing to all the elements. It is temperature resistant (upto 800°C) and chemical resistant with exceptional colour stability. The finished enamelled product is easy to maintain, clean and hygienic meaning it can be used for many applications internally and externally.

    Our vitreous enamel is available in a wide range of colours – plain or with screen printed graphics (block and 4 colour photographic images).

  5. #25
    holmburgers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Rochester NY (native KS)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,423
    Images
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Fisher View Post
    Hmmm, I wonder whether you could use a process like carbon printing and use the appropriate metals instead of carbon in the gelatin mixture...
    I too was thinking along these lines. Whitey, your explanation of ceramics is most helpful!

    If we know how and what is necessary (color forming substance, temperature and atmosphere), it seems that the carbon process provides the most desirable avenue for high quality ceramic prints. The gelatin will just burn off. It won't melt unless it is saturated with water.
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  6. #26
    Hexavalent's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    550
    Blog Entries
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by holmburgers View Post
    I too was thinking along these lines. Whitey, your explanation of ceramics is most helpful!

    If we know how and what is necessary (color forming substance, temperature and atmosphere), it seems that the carbon process provides the most desirable avenue for high quality ceramic prints. The gelatin will just burn off. It won't melt unless it is saturated with water.
    Caveat: Gelatin can be hardened by a variety of metallic salts, so not all are suitable for "glop". IIRC, a special "low ash" gelatin is used otherwise the fired finished can be prone to pitting and flaking.
    - Ian

  7. #27
    holmburgers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Rochester NY (native KS)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,423
    Images
    2
    Thanks Ian, these seem like very important caveats.

    Do any of Luis Nadeau's published books cover photoceramics? Perhaps the encyclopedia?

  8. #28
    Hexavalent's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    550
    Blog Entries
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by holmburgers View Post
    Thanks Ian, these seem like very important caveats.

    Do any of Luis Nadeau's published books cover photoceramics? Perhaps the encyclopedia?
    Luis' Encylopedia does mention many combinations and permutations of "photoceramics". Many familiar names appear: Poitevin, Joubert, Garnier and Salmon, Camarsac, Obernetter, and more. One would have to hunt down the patents, or journals of the era to procure the exact formulae and procedures.

    Start building a kiln Chris!
    - Ian

  9. #29
    holmburgers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Rochester NY (native KS)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,423
    Images
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by Hexavalent View Post
    Start building a kiln Chris!
    That's what I'm afraid of!

    I wonder how the Fuji Photoceram process works, particularly the image forming part?

    Anyone planning a trip to Japan?
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  10. #30
    bsdunek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Michigan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,155
    Images
    211
    I have put images on glass using 'Photo Fusing Paper' see: http://www.glass-fusing-made-easy.co...oto-paper.html
    This comes out sepia and is very interesting. I've made tiles, plates etc. using this process. It's not ceramic, but is very neat.
    Bruce

    Moma don't take my Kodachrome away!
    Oops, Kodak just did!
    For all practical purposes, they've taken Kodak away.


    BruceCSdunekPhotography.zenfolio.com

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin