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  1. #11
    donbga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by photomc
    In general, should I be able to find ruby lith at any art supply store?

    Thanks,
    Pearl Art Supply or any retailer that sells graphic arts materials usually stocks ruby or amber lith and rubylith tape. You can also use a UV opaque colored art paper, black or red for example about 40lb weight.

    Most times I will mask the negative to give even white borders on the print, sometimes however I will add a quater inch or so on each side of the mask opening to create a DMAX border which will be seen when the print is matted.

    I also try to cut the outside dimensions of the masking material to match the paper size unless it is a pretty large print. This way your image will be centered on the paper.

    Don Bryant

  2. #12
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    http://www.misterart.com/store/view....=656&store=001

    cut a mask with this ruby lith stuff, and put the negative ON TOP of the mask, IOW, the mask sits between the negative and your paper. I learned the hard way that you can get refracted light out the edges of your negative which will leave a nice thin unsightly black border on your pristine white paper. Using a mask is also the best method to check and make absolutely sure your clearing procedures are working properly. If you see stain or other stuff in the masked-off area, then your clearing methods are not adequate.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by photomc
    Actually have one of the puddle pushers from B&S, but find I get as good coverage from a foam brush as I do with it (now that may be because I'm not doing it right or the volume of solution is too high).

    Check out the thread about the Richeson 9010 brush. For me it uses less drops than the glass rod and is allot more fun. That foam brush is probably eating you alive.

  4. #14

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    Clay,
    No wonder I get a faint line once in awhile, I have putting the neg. between the paper and mask. Learn something everyday on this forum!

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mateo
    Check out the thread about the Richeson 9010 brush. For me it uses less drops than the glass rod and is allot more fun. That foam brush is probably eating you alive.
    Ditto on the Richeson. I bought three of the Richeson brushes in different sizes and gave the coating rods to a friend. In retrospect I feel guilty about giving them to a friend -- would have been better to have just thrown them in the garbage and told him about the Richeson.


    Sandy

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by clay
    http://www.misterart.com/store/view....=656&store=001

    cut a mask with this ruby lith stuff, and put the negative ON TOP of the mask, IOW, the mask sits between the negative and your paper. I learned the hard way that you can get refracted light out the edges of your negative which will leave a nice thin unsightly black border on your pristine white paper. Using a mask is also the best method to check and make absolutely sure your clearing procedures are working properly. If you see stain or other stuff in the masked-off area, then your clearing methods are not adequate.
    Dont you loose any sharpness at the edges like this? I thought about doing this whay but thought since ther will be a little space in between the negative and the paper, that I would loose shapness in the edges. I have had that very faint line in my prints on ocassion and always wondered what the hell caused it, I thought it was too much pressure from the vacuum frame....go figure..

  7. #17
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    That stuff is so thin that the vacuum frame or printing frame pretty much makes the any worries about lack of sharpness a moot point. BTW, I want to give credit to Kerik for alerting me to this phenomenom. He saw some of my prints I was getting ready for Fotofest that showed this faint black border, and it turns out he had had the same problem about five years earlier. As soon as I started putting the mask beneath the negative, the problem went away. Any sharpness loss is too small to even notice. And anyway, as Kerik also said shortly after pointing this out: "Print sniffers never buy prints anyway"

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by clay
    "Print sniffers never buy prints anyway"
    lol.....Thanks Clay, once more I owe you one.
    BTW, you should use that as your signature, it is now on the T shirt...

  9. #19

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    What Clay mentions is effectively a small amount of light that gets 'trapped' in the thickness of the film base, similar to how fiber optics work. Once it gets to the edge of the film, it dumps out onto the paper.

    There's nother reason that the borders under rubylith can show up sometimes, in addition to this. A very thin coating on the paper has a much higher printing speed then a thick coating. This happens especially when using a brush to caot, as there are often 'wisps' of coating out at the edges that may be excessively thin. They will sensitize with much less UV exposure. If I see that, I double up the rubylith, and it normally takes care of the problem.

    ---Michael
    www.mutmansky.com
    B&W photography in Silver, Palladium, and gum bichromate.

  10. #20

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    Tried Clay's suggestion today and it worked perfect. Used orange base line masking sheet between neg and paper. No problems and print is sharp with nice clean borders. Thanks Clay, Kerik,....

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