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  1. #11
    SMBooth's Avatar
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    Thanks:
    I don't know if I 'need' to harden it, just would like to now how so I can try using harder ink in comparison to a softer ink in my learning stage. By what Jerevan said a matix soaked in warmer water will accept the softer ink better. (i could not get the harder 1803)

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by gandolfi View Post
    my 2 cents:

    the oils I have worked are all far too soft for using without hardening. That's why I use it.

    I buy the magnesium carbonate in the same store where I buy the ink, but I have also in the past tried something ammonium - something (the actual name eludes me).

    As I have never tried the aforementioned suggestions, I'll stick (pun intended) to the magnesium....

    Clive: one reason to use hardener is, that it can be a means to highten/lower the contrast in the final bromoil..

    (the stiffer ink, the higher contrast..)
    I think one of the problems here is that there are probably as many variables in the modus operandi of making Bromoils, as there are people making them. I have always found achieving low contrast bromoils more difficult than high contrast versions. I have posted one on the experimental media gallery made with soft lithographic ink.
    Last edited by cliveh; 12-20-2011 at 04:46 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #13

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    You can use 81053: : Charbonnel Litho Crayon Black 200ml
    straight out of the can without any stiffening.
    Graphic Chemical product.

  4. #14
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    You can use magnesium carbonate to stiffen lithographic ink. A source for this would be Bostick & Sullivan: http://www.bostick-sullivan.com/cart...=search&page=1

    Cheers -

    george

  5. #15
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    I had the pleasure to meet Maija McDougal last year who gave a demonstration of the technique and some advice. She told me that most inks sold today are to soft and she uses beeswax to stiffen it. I tried Silverprint Bromoil ink and was given a jar of Maija's ink, the later was much better! But then I am no expert.

  6. #16
    SMBooth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GLSmyth View Post
    You can use magnesium carbonate to stiffen lithographic ink. A source for this would be Bostick & Sullivan: http://www.bostick-sullivan.com/cart...=search&page=1

    Cheers -

    george
    I read that, do you know in what ratios of Magnesium to Ink. I tried a 1:1of Magnesium Sulfate but didn't seem to effect it.

    I did mix plain old candle wax and that certainly harden it up, but how it work I'll have to wait and see until after Christmas.

  7. #17

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    one can also use starch such as dextrine or pigment powder itself to harden the ink

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