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  1. #11
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
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    Some postulates his mathematics ideas on a corner of a book , some dicovers them 30 years later and some others wastes 150 years to proof it.

    I am one of them but not to prefer being Chriss voice !

    With playing too much things together , he will have a ability as Circus Athlete to patent every new his ideas

  2. #12
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    cliveh, I completely understand what you're saying, but I'm hearing this kind of criticism at nearly every turn nowadays and it must be understood what my intentions are in the first place, because I'm starting to get incredibly frustrated by it.

    There are two completely different facets in my photographic pursuits; practical work and ideation. This post should be a very clear example of the latter.

    Coming up with ideas and discussing them is in itself an end, and I wish this was embraced by more people.

    I'm not going to go home and pour glass into plaster molds... not today, not next week, probably never! But then again, if the idea started to gain traction and the idea became so attractive and plausible then there might be a point where a new phase of practical work begins to take place.

    To be honest I do feel a bit patronized, and I don't understand why there's this assumption that because I'm always brining up wild and varied suggestions that I'm not working on a handful of things quite diligently at home... which is exactly what's actually happening.
    Last edited by holmburgers; 12-21-2011 at 03:56 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by holmburgers View Post
    Coming up with ideas and discussing them is in itself an end, and I wish this was embraced by more people.
    I'm sure you've noticed that there are some kinds of people that like to talk and hypothesize, and others who focus on "getting things done". There are even people (lets call them type-3) who don't like to talk at all, no matter what. It is frustrating for both types to interact. I'm an expert at that kind of frustration. My wife is type-1 and I'm type-2. She can talk endlessly about things I think will never come to any good.

  4. #14
    Jerevan's Avatar
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    I guess it is because there is an assumption that someone with a lot of ideas, only has... a lot of ideas. And nobody here knows if someone is sitting in the nude and posting chemical recipes (I hope not!) - we only have the words to go on, if you see what I mean.
    “Do your work, then step back. The only path to serenity.” - Lao Tzu

  5. #15
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    holmburgers, I do apologise, I did not wish to offend.

  6. #16

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    In my business I find "idea men" to be extremely valuable, and somewhat frustrating at the same time. But I couldn't survive without the two kinds of thinkers: deep thinkers, and "out of the box" thinkers! I find them just as valuable (and somewhat frustrating) on internet forums. Let's be thankful for those who think!

  7. #17

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    I took a glassblowing class at CityArts in Wichita some years ago and from that experience I can tell you that glass has far too high of a viscosity to fill small details. Plus, by the time you get the glass out of the furnace it's already cooled to a not-so-viscous lump. I've also worked with acrylic resin. It may be viscous enough to fill smallish details. You can color a portion of the resin to fill the deepest portions and use clear for the rest.

    With glass etching, you'll really only be able to make a single tone image since you would have to use a photo sensitive mask and then etch - details galore, but no depth and no tones.

    The closest I've seen to what you're asking is laser etching acrylic sheets. I used to work at a place with laser cutter/router and one project we did was to take continuous tone images of a bust of a man & woman and etch them into the reverse side of acrylic for men's & women's spa signage. They were able to configure the laser cutter to vary the laser output with tone from the image and create a 3d etching.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by holmburgers View Post
    Process history savants?
    Has anyone mentioned ambrotypes yet? They, of course, are continuous tone images ON glass rather than IN glass.

  9. #19
    MDR
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    Very thin glass layers each with a different color or tone like with three color etchings or woodcuts a glassplate/etching for every color and removal of the uneccessary glass might work. You have to ask a glassblower (best from Czech republic, Italy murano, you could also contact Schott Glass they are very helpful and they know a lot about glass) about the pigment or colors they use maybe one of them reacts to UV light or find a temperature ( 700°C +) but not UV resistant color. Holmburger great idea btw

    Dominik

  10. #20
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
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    Glass etching can be done as rotogravure printing plates done may be 40 years ago by hand.

    There are many artists who carve out the glass from back side and create very appealing art.

    Rotogravure plates are copper and when the separation films ready from prepress , they cover the copper plate with gelatin and paper hybrid material - they call this tiffdruck paper - and make gelatin stick to copper. Tiffdruck paper gets a relief by light and than excess gelatin being removed by water.
    Than the etching starts. Higher the relief , more time to be eaten by acid and lower the etching depth and lower the relief , deeper the dots and more ink being transferred to the paper.

    Same technic easily but more dangerously can be done with fluoric acid but the easiest thing to learn the process , not to invade Germany or Italy but have call the Corning Glass Museum at NY.

    Glass blowers uses low temp. glasses at their furnaces which invented at a Corning Studio and Corning Chemists.

    I forgot the guys name but he had had visited the Murano Italy and saw there , for each glass studio , there is a small furnace at the door and presented shows to the tourists.

    When he found , glass furnaces could be very small , he starts the American Glass Studio Movement with low temp formula.

    And pouring on plaster , if there is trace amount of moisture , everything can explode to the face.

    Annealing of poured glass at least 24 hours , could soften the micron detail also.

    Umut

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