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Thread: Vandyke issues

  1. #11
    Hexavalent's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SMBooth View Post
    Update, spend the day playing, problem was indeed to much sensitiser. I brought a Hake brush to apply, still having application problems, but that seem to be my technique and perhaps oily fingers as the paper has spotty marks all over it.
    One of the papers I use for alt-process seems to have a light coating of dust (perhaps talc), likely from the finishing/packaging process. This surface dust (or whatever it is) reveals handling marks (even gloved hands) only on the final print -- very frustrating! I've discovered that a very gentle wipe with a barely damp cloth/sponge and few minutes to dry before coating makes a huge difference.
    - Ian

  2. #12
    Hexavalent's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    ...Add to this about two tablespoons of Borax powder and stir until dissolved. Then add print/s and agitate/stir for about 5 minutes (you will now observe a wash out). Then wash in running water for about 10 minutes before fix.
    The following reducer works very well with VDB:
    Potassium Ferricyanide .25 gm
    Potassium Bromide .2 gm
    Hypo 5 gm
    Water to make 1000 ml

    It works well to clear highlights and salvage moderately overexposed prints.

    It is a bit risky to treat most iron-based processes in an alkaline environment unless one is sure that ALL the iron salts have been washed out. If they remain, it is only a matter of time before fading and mottling appear. A pinch of citric acid or EDTA hastens the removal of the unwanted salts before fixing.
    - Ian

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hexavalent View Post
    The following reducer works very well with VDB:
    Potassium Ferricyanide .25 gm
    Potassium Bromide .2 gm
    Hypo 5 gm
    Water to make 1000 ml

    It works well to clear highlights and salvage moderately overexposed prints.

    It is a bit risky to treat most iron-based processes in an alkaline environment unless one is sure that ALL the iron salts have been washed out. If they remain, it is only a matter of time before fading and mottling appear. A pinch of citric acid or EDTA hastens the removal of the unwanted salts before fixing.
    Hexalent, just to clarify your post, are you advocating this formula as a replacement to borax dissolved in water at this stage in the process, i.e. before washing and fixation? If so are you also advocating same regardless of oxalic or tartric in original formulation?

  4. #14
    Hexavalent's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    Hexalent, just to clarify your post, are you advocating this formula as a replacement to borax dissolved in water at this stage in the process, i.e. before washing and fixation? If so are you also advocating same regardless of oxalic or tartric in original formulation?
    I use the 'bleach' after 'normal' processing (wash out the excess salts, fix, wash). A dry print can be soaked in water briefly and then bleached if so desired. As there can be considerable dry-down with VDB, I find it easier to determine if a print requires bleaching when it has been fully processed and dry.


    A pinch of citric acid in the first wash, regardless of the oxalic/tartaric content of the sensitizer should do no harm; it's purpose is to aid the removal (chelate) of unwanted iron salts that can form insoluble compounds (particularly in alkaline water). I see the citric acid as being cheap insurance
    - Ian

  5. #15
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Hexalent, I understand your point, but have you ever tried Borax as a substitute at that 1st stage in the process?

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    cliveh, what's the point of borax? Borax solutions are alkaline, and by using borax before getting rid of the excess iron in the print (that takes place at the first couple of rinses in pH neutral or very slightly acidic water), you guarantee formation of iron hydroxide in the paper, which is definitely detrimental to both the image and the paper. In the context of iron-silver processes, any alkaline treatment before rinse / toning and fixing should be avoided at all costs...

  7. #17
    SMBooth's Avatar
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    Appreciate your help guys, the spot look like water droplets, so I will give your idea a go Hexalent. I have seen the reducer formula but was going to leave it until I got the basics worked out. I'll give the borax and citrus a go as like I said earlier nothing seem to wash out of the paper it the first wash maybe this will help. Again thanks to you both.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loris Medici View Post
    cliveh, what's the point of borax? Borax solutions are alkaline, and by using borax before getting rid of the excess iron in the print (that takes place at the first couple of rinses in pH neutral or very slightly acidic water), you guarantee formation of iron hydroxide in the paper, which is definitely detrimental to both the image and the paper. In the context of iron-silver processes, any alkaline treatment before rinse / toning and fixing should be avoided at all costs...
    I beg to differ.

  9. #19

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    Shane, stay away of borax if you want your prints to last... BTW, citric acid pre-treatment (very little is enough) is what I do too - but that may not be the solution of your particular problem, it's good-practice nevertheless. (I add few drops of 40% citric acid solution into the coating solution too, makes most papers work better. N.B. I add it to the coating solution, not the stock sensitizer solution.)

    Regards,
    Loris.

  10. #20

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    cliveh, be my guest if you want to differ. In any case, I have to suggest that you do some reading about the chemistry / conservation of iron-silver processes / prints (and paper conservation too...)

    Regards,
    Loris.
    Last edited by Loris Medici; 12-29-2011 at 05:17 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Fixing typos

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