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Thread: Kitchen Sink

  1. #1
    Reinhold's Avatar
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    Kitchen Sink

    A couple of 8x10 Paper negs of a messy kitchen sink...
    I used my 500mm f:6.9 Wollaston Meniscus on an extended Kodak 2-D
    The lens to faucet distance was 1.5 meters (59 inches).
    One shot wide open @ f:6.9, the other @ f:16, using ISO 10, no filter.
    Fresh Photo Warehouse rc paper, pre-flashed 1 second, developed 3 minutes in Ansco 130, @ 1+15 dilution.

    Reinhold
    www.re-inventedPhotoEquip.com
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Sink, 500 f6.9@ 96.jpg   Sink, 500 f16@96.jpg  

  2. #2
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reinhold View Post
    A couple of 8x10 Paper negs of a messy kitchen sink...
    I used my 500mm f:6.9 Wollaston Meniscus on an extended Kodak 2-D
    The lens to faucet distance was 1.5 meters (59 inches).
    One shot wide open @ f:6.9, the other @ f:16, using ISO 10, no filter.
    Fresh Photo Warehouse rc paper, pre-flashed 1 second, developed 3 minutes in Ansco 130, @ 1+15 dilution.

    Reinhold
    www.re-inventedPhotoEquip.com
    And your question is?

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

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    I'm curious as to the process you've used to end up with positive images.... An unusual subject.... I like them!
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

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    I also like them! I want to get into shooting large format paper negs..

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    Reinhold's Avatar
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    Thanks for the kind comments.

    Just to verify that these are true paper negatives, here's a positive photo (and a negative) of the negatives (chuckle).
    I took the quick way of scanning them and inverting the scans using Photoshop to get positives for the original post.

    Tomorrow I'll lay a negative face-to-face with some photo paper, lay a sheet of glass over the sandwich and expose it under the enlarger.
    That'll take a bit longer, since I'll need to determine the ideal printing times and play with dodging and burning.
    (The curtains, for example could use some burning.)

    Caution: paper negatives are contageous...

    Reinhold
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_0619 pos.jpg   IMG_0619 neg.JPG  

  6. #6
    Film Guerilla's Avatar
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    very nice! i sent you email by the way
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    I can't quite get my head around this....

    You shoot with paper instead of film in the back... the image is upside down. You turn the paper around and it's right side up.

    Sandwich paper emulsion side to emulsion side and bake for few minutes....

    Wouldn't the resulting image be right side left when compared to reality?

    or am I flipped around again??
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  8. #8

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    Have not checked this forum for quite some time. It appears I should. I really like the tones you have managed to get out of a paper negative Reinhold. I bought some 4X5 VC paper from Ultrafine but even with preflashing cannot control the contrast. Very hard to get a range of grays. I've had some success with Ilford MGIV, it seems work much better than the Ultrafine brand.

    Addressing tkamiya's question;

    It is much easier to do than to get your head around it.

    Really it is the same as any negative/positive process. You are just replacing the film with photo paper. That gives you a negative that is reversed from left to right (a mirror image if you will). Then just lay that negative, emulsion to emulsion on photo paper, place a heavy piece of clean glass on top to keep then in contact, and expose with white light for a few seconds. Process the bottom paper as you would any darkroom print and you will wind up with a positive with the correct orientation.

    The difference between a paper negative and a film negative is that the film negative is on a transparent base so that it can be viewed from either side. A paper negative base is, well it's paper, so can only be seen clearly from the front (emulsion side). The making of a print from a negative is the same principal. When you stick the negative in the enlarger the emulsion still has to face the paper.

    I must now muddy the waters a bit. Just a small exception. A negative from a Tessina has to be printed emulsion up. That is because the image from the lens is bounced 90 degrees from a first surface mirror onto the film and thus, when viewed from the emulsion side is not reversed, left to right.



 

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