Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,562   Posts: 1,573,328   Online: 1000
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Thread: Paper negative

  1. #1

    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Rome Italy
    Posts
    56
    Images
    1

    Paper negative

    Ok, I've done it: I've converted a shoebox to pinhole camera and have taken my very first shot. As a light sensitive material I've used a sheet of Ilford RC MG IV, the paper I use for ordinary print. The main problem with this paper is its very high contrast. Is there any other paper that is more advisable for this kind of usage? Does the finishing of the paper matters?

    Grazie & Ciao,

    Marcello

  2. #2
    bmac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    San Jose, CA
    Posts
    2,156
    Images
    9
    Why not try graded paper? grade 1 or 2...
    hi!

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,990
    Images
    1
    you can tame the contrast a little by putting a Grade 00 filter behind the pinhole. Have you contact printed the neg to a positive or are you basing your assessment on the neg, which usually look to have more contrast than you'd think.

  4. #4
    Ole
    Ole is offline
    Ole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Bergen, Norway
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    9,282
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    31
    If you can get hold of Varycon paper (Croatian, I believe), that has the longest shoulder of all papers I've ever used. In normal printing you will never approach Dmax at any filtration without turning the entire image dark grey to black - or black to deep black. Those are exactly the qualities that makes it a good paper-negative "film"...
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  5. #5

    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    336
    marcello,

    If you are unable to find a paper with low enough contrast, another alternative is to shorten the exposure time by about 1/3, then flash the paper with a "not so safe light" I use a 7wt with an amber filter for approximately 10% of your exposure time. For example, you determine that 30 seconds should be abour 1/3 less than your "usual" exposure, so you would want to lightly flash the paper for 2.5-3.5 seconds. This lays down a gray mask overall similar to film.

    Another alternative, would be run you piece of paper through developer before applying it to the pinhole camera. Be sure to squeegee or sponge drips off of it. Then expose first for approx. 1/2 of exposure time, then let the paper sit unmoved in the dark for about 2 minutes, then re-expose for 2/3 the normal exposure time, then re-develop as normal. Apparently the pre-exposure lays down and intelligent mask for the remainder of the exposure which effectively lowers contrast.

    I tend to use multi-grade papers, which also give you the option of simply adding a low contrast filter over the pinhole.

    JL
    Embrace **it! **it. . .just another name for fertilizer. . . Grow baby Grow!

  6. #6
    lee
    lee is offline
    lee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Fort Worth TX
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,913
    Images
    8
    [quote="Darkroom ChromaCrafts"]marcello,
    Another alternative, would be run you piece of paper through developer before applying it to the pinhole camera. Be sure to squeegee or sponge drips off of it. Then expose first for approx. 1/2 of exposure time, then let the paper sit unmoved in the dark for about 2 minutes, then re-expose for 2/3 the normal exposure time, then re-develop as normal. Apparently the pre-exposure lays down and intelligent mask for the remainder of the exposure which effectively lowers contrast. [quote]

    I don't think I want my pinhole camera soaked in developer. next what if in that 2 minutes while you are waiting something moves? This might work for a graphic arts camera which is what DCC is using and everything is on a copy board but I don't think this is very practical for normal run of the mill pinhole work.

    lee\c

  7. #7
    Aggie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    So. Utah
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,925
    Images
    6
    ..

  8. #8

    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    336
    Quote Originally Posted by lee
    I don't think I want my pinhole camera soaked in developer. next what if in that 2 minutes while you are waiting something moves? This might work for a graphic arts camera which is what DCC is using and everything is on a copy board but I don't think this is very practical for normal run of the mill pinhole work.

    lee\c
    Uhm, okay, but if you squeegee, I don't think it would do much but leave a stain. But you are right, I was thinking about copy cameras, huh? Sorry.

    Anyway the flash idea should work. And Aggie's styrofoam cup still sounds like a great choice.
    Embrace **it! **it. . .just another name for fertilizer. . . Grow baby Grow!

  9. #9

    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    336
    Quote Originally Posted by Aggie
    if you preflash the paper, it is easy to do with a styrofoam cup. Put the paper under your enlarger, make sure the lense is set for the lowest F stop, and then with the cup held over the lense, expose for any where from 12 to 25 seconds, depending on how much you need. It is the easiest trick I know to flash with short of using a raincoat.
    Aggie, I think this is twice I've noticed you mention a "preflash", are you flashing the paper prior to exposure? And if so does this make substantial difference from flashing after? Or is this another one of those times wherein I just don't get the lingo?
    Embrace **it! **it. . .just another name for fertilizer. . . Grow baby Grow!

  10. #10
    Aggie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    So. Utah
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,925
    Images
    6
    ..

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin