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  1. #11
    MattKing's Avatar
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    FWIW, I have four sets of caps and two 11x14 Cibachrome tube bodies that I use for 11x14 RC prints when I decide to use trays.

    The bodies are easy and quick to wash and dry. The caps take a bit more time, and benefit from a chance to drip/dry.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  2. #12

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    CPE2 is fairly small, and very light and empty, and you only need to fill it with water if you are doing color processing.
    If you have more then one tank, you can have several prints made in succession, with out having to wait and reload in to a wet drum.

  3. #13

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    John mentioned moving prints between tubes. Less of a problem if the print is RC. After full processing I was having a little difficulty extracting a fiber print from the Unidrum. Unidrums are similar to a Patterson film developing tank in quality and function. I bought a new Unidrum ($15) to ensure new lid gaskets. If a lid leaked or fell off it would be a disaster with my wife. What spouse would be happy with spilled fixer on the Maytag washer.

    Matt, does the Cibachrome tube body have two notches where the paper juts up to as it wraps around the tube? If so, this would be similar to the Unidrum configuration.

    Jobo is an expensive answer. Current e-bay price is $400 for a mint unit without drum. Drums are over $50.00.

    Since my concern is a leak, if the JOBO end cap is robust and leak resistant, I could buy a JOBO tube and process without a mechanical roller. What JOBO tube part number would process one 11x14 inch print??????
    Last edited by Richard Jepsen; 02-14-2012 at 01:52 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    RJ

  4. #14

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    Jobo drum 2840 will do up to 12X16, you can use a uniroller to agitate it.
    Jobo drums do not leak, and unless you do not close them properly they will never accidentally open during process.

  5. #15

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    Also, the 2800 series tanks from Jobo, have small ridges inside going from top to bottom, making extracting the prints a breeze.

  6. #16

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    A Jobo CPE is a bit of overkill for B&W, and needs the foot print of about 2 11x14 trays. For tubes and space savings a roller base and tubes from unicolor, Jobo or Cibachrome would be a better choice, absent other considerations.

    My 11x14 (12x16 actually) Nova takes about 1800 ml of chemistry per slot. If you use a developer with good longevity then it can last for weeks. The slots have tubes and valves for draining, and if you're working in a temporary space you could drain it after each session, you probably don't want to move it around full. The drained developer would last even longer in a full, tightly closed bottle.

    Doing B&W in tubes slows down your workflow considerably. First off, since you can't monitor the print progress you don't know until processing is completed that your exposure is way off. Then there is all the cleaning and drying between runs, even for test strips. Multiple tubes help, but don't eliminate the problem. Finally, a print isn't always processed to "completion", but if you're using a tube you're stuck with processing strictly by time, or doing muliple tests just to find the best processing time. Experience and perhaps working with a meter will help, but not eliminate those issues.

    My darkroom is tiny, and I initally tried tube processing in my Jobo, but abandoned the idea pretty quickly, then I found a Nova at a good price and never looked back. YMMV though. If I were doing a temporary space shared with the laundry, I'd build a plywood "counter" to go on top of the machines and put the trays on it side by side. I'd probably build it with a short lip maybe 1 inch high to contain any spills. Then, when the printing session is over, empty the trays, wipe down the plywood and set it on it's end/side wherever it could go.

  7. #17
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Jepsen View Post

    Matt, does the Cibachrome tube body have two notches where the paper juts up to as it wraps around the tube? If so, this would be similar to the Unidrum configuration.
    Richard:

    There are no notches in the Cibachrome tubes. I usually have no problem removing my (RC) prints, although sometimes I'll "encourage" them by starting the first corner in standing water.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  8. #18

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    Wow, thanks krifartida for the drum model. It's possible to not install a Unidrum lid on correctly. Good to know the JOBO tanks are better in this regard. I'll buy one JOBO tank and rotate by hand or use a Uniroller.

    I'd build a plywood "counter" to go on top of the machines and put the trays on it side by side
    This is exactly what I do with 5x7 and 8x10 trays. 1/8 thick, stores next to the washer out of sight. I will continue to tray develop when processing 8x10s. Just the 11x14 was an issue.

    I use 5x7 trays for test strips, when statisfied with the print map/exposure/burn, I project the image on 11x14 paper, develop, weak stop, water flush, TF-4, 60s water flush, move to a hold tray, rinse out tube. Back to the enlarger for repeat. Its slow but I'm not trying to be quick.

    Bdial, I read Nova processors can be used for fiber. A fiber Nova unit uses additional clips and a tapered construction. Definite benefits seeing a print develop. Having the unit ready to go is also great. My concerns on chemical shelf life seem unfounded.

    My process results in the enlarger remaining on a counter top between the washer and dryer. I would have to move a Nova system. A processing tube for larger prints is a case where less is more; often the desirable path in photography.
    Last edited by Richard Jepsen; 02-14-2012 at 02:33 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    RJ

  9. #19

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    A 12x16 Nova would be great for you but needs draining before moving. That's the water jackets and slots.The weight of liquid in the jackets and slots when moving is likely to strain the processor. An exception might be if the processor just needs moving on the same level i.e. no lifting. Then moving it on its feet in a crab-like fashion might be possible without undue strain on the structure.. I think the later versions have drain taps for both jackets and slots. Mine only has drains for the slots so needs upending to drain the jackets which is a bit of a pain if this has to be done every time you use it.

    pentaxuser

  10. #20
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    I have a 16x20 Nova slot processor. It takes up less space than a single 16x20 tray. I've printed 16x20 fiber paper in it before without issues. As to the chemistry oxidizing, well, bear in mind that A: they are supplied with floating lids for each slot, and B: the surface area of each slot is only about 3/4" x the long dimension of the largest size paper the processor is meant to handle. I used Ansco 130 as a paper developer in mine and it was still going strong over a month after mixing it. Ideally, you should get a small rolling cart you can keep the processor on and then wheel it in and out of the darkroom when you're not printing. Then you'd just need to drain the chemicals between printing sessions. Also, I'd use an acid stop with the Nova, not a water stop, because you'll get too much chemical carry-over.

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