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  1. #1
    CPorter's Avatar
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    Exercising Your Shutters

    I know you shouldn't store a lense with the shutter cocked. But, I'm just wandering how many excercise their shutters on their lenses that haven't been used in a while. I will occasionally pull my lenses out and cycle the shutter through all the speeds. Does this seem prudent or really not necessary?

    Chuck

  2. #2
    David Lyga's Avatar
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    A clean, mechanical shutter does not need 'exercise'. This is said to be necessary only because of the gunk in there which needs to be 'freed'. Lighter fluid works wonders. Don't keep them cocked. - David Lyga

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    I am not systematic about it, but I do occasionally test my shutters. What I am very careful about, is I will test fire my shutters before making the actual exposure. A couple of test firings will often free a sluggish shutter or sticky cable release. More than once I have caught a problem that would have ruined an otherwise carefully prepared photograph.
    Tom, on Point Pelee, Canada

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  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by David Lyga View Post
    A clean, mechanical shutter does not need 'exercise'.
    This is a fact. I'd like to add "and properly lubricated" just for clarity and completeness.

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    Even with a clean, properly lubricated shutter it is a good idea, if it hasn't been used that day, to cycle it a few times to "settle" the lubrication and ensure that the speeds will be consistent. This is just the nature of the beasties. You can change the rate of a precision mechanical time piece, simply by letting it run down and stop. It may or may not return to it's original rate.

  6. #6

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    i exercised one of my shutters just this morning ... on a cyclone #5 magazine camera.
    the shutter was hanging on T ... so i switched it to I and fired it 10-20 times
    and T works fine now ... much easier than removing the 4 screws, removing the faceplate,
    taking out the lint and adding a few drops of amber oil ....
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  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    You can change the rate of a precision mechanical time piece, simply by letting it run down and stop. It may or may not return to it's original rate.
    In that context I totally agree, but how often does a few milliseconds ever make much of a difference in photographic exposure?

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post
    In that context I totally agree, but how often does a few milliseconds ever make much of a difference in photographic exposure?
    I was offering an example to make a point.

    Edit: At 1/1000 sec, a few milliseconds makes a difference.

  9. #9

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    Ahh.. yes, and a good point in that context!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by CPorter View Post
    I know you shouldn't store a lense with the shutter cocked.
    We have argued this point before. Some manufacturers say leave them cocked, others say not to. The reality is that there is not much difference in the tension of a spring if the shutter is cocked or not as it does not go anywhere near completely slack when fired.

    The fact that many models of medium format camera can only mount and dismount lenses when cocked leads me to think that is the best way to leave them.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

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