Switch to English Language Passer en langue franšaise Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,957   Posts: 1,586,078   Online: 975
      
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 37
  1. #1
    sterioma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Italy
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    259
    Images
    22

    Spiral jams loading the film

    Hi,

    I am an absolute beginner in developing my BW film, I have just started a few weeks ago and so far I have processed 4 rolls (35mm, all 36 frames).

    Almost all the times, when I load the film into my plastic reel (Paterson), I have jams at the end of the process, so I usually end up doing it over again 2-3 times.

    I have tought that maybe I am not cutting enough leader away from the film and that the film reach some kind of physical "constrain" when I am about to finish, causing the jam.

    Before wasting a roll doing a test in the daylight to see what happens, do you think that maybe cutting some more leader would help (with the risk of cutting through the first frame)? Or should I look for other causes?

    I should add that my Nikon camera forces me to skip the first frames (making blank exposures) before the metering starts to work (usually 3 blank frames).
    Last edited by sterioma; 11-15-2004 at 07:51 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Typo

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Naestved, DK
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,337
    Hi
    I had that problem to after developing a couple of films. I got my tanks and reels used from another photographer and they had been used intesively. If you cut the corners on the inlet of the film aprox. 1-2mm and that dosn't help you should try cleaning the reels with a nailbrush some soap and rinse them with plain water and let them dry a couple of hours before using them. It worked wonders in my case. make sure the reels are dry and the tiny balls don't jam.
    Regards S°ren

  3. #3
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,487
    Images
    20
    Paterson reels need to be absolutely dry or they won't work. This is part of the reason I prefer stainless, but if plastic works for you otherwise, and you need to develop multiple batches of film occasionally, you might try to pick up some extra reels, so you always have some dry ones.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  4. #4
    sterioma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Italy
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    259
    Images
    22
    Soren, David, thanks for commenting.

    I forgot to mention that my spirals are always absolutely dry (I never develop more than one roll per day... or per week I should say). Also, I have bought them brand new. Therefore I would exclude humidity or dirty from the causes.

  5. #5
    ann
    ann is offline

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    2,883
    Images
    26
    At times students have the same problem. What is happening with them is nerves. They are worried that they will not be successful, get nervous and then the hands get damp and the edges of the film react to the dampness and the film jams. The longer one wrestles with the film the less likely the film will go on smoothly.

    It is not unusual for the first few rolls to be a problem, and occasionally later on, but that is not a regular issue.

    In my experience, one's mental expectation becomes reality. When they expect to have problems they do. We have had several that had such problems I assigned them a visualation assignment to over come the expectation that they would fail.
    Have you practiced with an old roll in the daylight, then close your eyes and continue to practice until your comfort level rises then go for the real thing?

  6. #6
    PieterB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    near Aalter, Belgium
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    809
    Images
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb
    Paterson reels need to be absolutely dry or they won't work. This is part of the reason I prefer stainless, but if plastic works for you otherwise, and you need to develop multiple batches of film occasionally, you might try to pick up some extra reels, so you always have some dry ones.
    No problems with (a bit) wet plastic reels. Just cut the corners so they're not straight.
    "The camera can be the most deadly weapon since the assassin's bullet. Or it can be the lotion of the heart - Norman Parkinson".

  7. #7
    sterioma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Italy
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    259
    Images
    22
    Quote Originally Posted by ann
    At times students have the same problem. What is happening with them is nerves. They are worried that they will not be successful, get nervous and then the hands get damp and the edges of the film react to the dampness and the film jams. The longer one wrestles with the film the less likely the film will go on smoothly.
    Hmm... this is an interesting point, Ann! I might have a "performance anxiety" synthom in my own bathroom
    Actually, my hands might become a bit damp after I get nervous about it... still I wonder why it always happens at the end and never in the middle or at the beginning.


    Quote Originally Posted by ann
    Have you practiced with an old roll in the daylight, then close your eyes and continue to practice until your comfort level rises then go for the real thing?
    Yes I did practice first in daylight and than in the darkness. But the film was a 24 frames only, hence my "theory" about the film being to long (since I might not be cutting enough from the beginning before loading).

  8. #8
    Adrian Twiss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Wigan (oop North) United Kingdom
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    612
    Images
    10
    Another possible factor is that it is not unusal to speed up the loading motion as you come to the end of the film. I used to be guilty of this. You should keep an even tempo from start to finish.

    Adrian

  9. #9
    sparx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Norfolk UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    376
    I use plastic reels and find i'm more likely to get jams with 36 exposure rolls than with 24. Whether it's because as the film gets to the middle of the reel the spiral gets tighter and creates more friction I don't know. If I do get a jam I just pull the spirals apart slightly, give it lots of little wriggles and that usually sorts it.
    [size=1]the all new darkplanet photoblog[/size][size=1]
    [/size]

  10. #10
    ann
    ann is offline

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    2,883
    Images
    26
    It may happen at the end because your hands become more damp the longer it takes to feed the reel.

    The newer Patterson reels can be loaded if "damp". We have tested them vs the older version which could not be loaded if they came near moisture. However, as a beginner you will be more successful if the reel is complelely dry as yours seems to be.

    Also, like many others I have loaded much longer runs of film than 36 with no problems.

    At one time Ilford made 72 exposure rolls, great for sports and motor drives, but very thin and curled like crazy. Needed a special reel and had its own loader, which I could never use, but with some practice , no problem. However, it was short lived as the thinner base played havoc with the commerical processers so it went the way of the Edsel auto.

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  Ś   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin