Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,449   Posts: 1,570,080   Online: 861
      
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 38
  1. #21
    MurrayMinchin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    North Coast, BC, Canada
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    4,196
    Images
    15
    This ones new to me, so here's my method of madness for FB;

    Develop, 30 second water stop, 1st bath TF-3 for 1 minute, 2nd bath TF-3 for 1 minute, straight into the selenium toner, water bath with agitation for a couple minutes in a "darkroom use only" kitty litter tray where I leave it to soak for a while (I'm not doing bigger than 11x14 for now), transfer to another kitty litter tray until end of printing session, then into a Kostiner print washer for 40 minutes to an hour, squeegee, face up to dry on plastic screens. (My prints passed the residual hypo test after 20 minutes, but I at least double that time).

    I was seduced by marketing years ago when I was inexperienced, and spent HUGE bucks on the print washer...I'd go with the soak and transfer if I didn't already have it.

    Murray

  2. #22
    Bob F.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    London
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,984
    Images
    19
    10 mins hypo clear followed by 6 x 15 minute soak and dumps. I carry a kitchen timer around with me until I'm done... Used to use a plastic crate with a Paterson RC print dryer tray in it to keep the prints apart but now use a print washer with a quick-dump facility (the old crate took a while to dump through a syphon).

    Cheers, Bob.

  3. #23
    Flotsam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    S.E. New York State
    Posts
    3,221
    Images
    13
    Do you give the prints a first wash before the hypo clear? Perma Wash calls for one.

    I like to visit that APUG chat room while washing my prints. I need a countdown timer program for my computer
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  4. #24
    Saganich's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Brooklyn
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    447
    Images
    176
    Someone here mentioned US Plastics. Well, I just got my 24x18x12 plastic tank and they were nice enough to install a 1/2 inch input and a 1 inch output fitting for a couple bucks extra. For another 15 bucks I bought enough 1/8 inch plastic sheet for 6 dividers although I can get at least 12 in the tank, (I have to cut them to size). I'll notch some PVC to hold the dividers in place and support the paper. All in all I spent about $100. I can drain the thing in under 5 minutes. With A ball valve for the output I can circulate water a bit or just fill and dump. It all is still on the drawing board. If it works I'de be happy to put together a parts list.
    Chris Saganich
    http://www.imagebrooklyn.com

  5. #25
    MurrayMinchin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    North Coast, BC, Canada
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    4,196
    Images
    15

    Ask and Ye shall receive

    Quote Originally Posted by Flotsam
    I need a countdown timer program for my computer
    http://www.jsr.communitech.net/stopwatch2.htm

    I use it while dry mounting

    Murray

  6. #26
    Bob F.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    London
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,984
    Images
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by Flotsam
    Do you give the prints a first wash before the hypo clear? Perma Wash calls for one.

    I like to visit that APUG chat room while washing my prints. I need a countdown timer program for my computer
    Yes, sorry - left out that bit. The full sequence is: from the fixer (single bath - checked for clearing time and silver content before use) they get 3 - 5 mins wash in running water then in to a holding bath for 30 mins or more while I continue printing and then all in to the hypo clear and a quick rinse (probably pointless, but makes me feel good!) before going in to the 1st wash.

    I use the freeware Fotolab software on my laptop from: http://www.bonavolta.ch/hobby/en/photo/fotolab.htm - the price is right and it works The Dry Side component includes a handy test-strip calculator - useful for those of us that like to use use f-stop printing timings but have not got an f-stop timer....

    Cheers, Bob.

  7. #27
    esanford's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Hertford North Carolina
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    637
    Images
    16
    I develop, stop and fix. Then bathe in Zone VI hypo clearing agent (similar to permawash) for 10-15 minutes. I then wash in an Oriental archival washer for 1 1/2 hours. I dry the prints on screens. At that point I store these prints in archival sleeves.

    Once I have an inventory of at least 8-10 prints I do a selenium toning process. I take the prints out of the sleeves and put them in a tray of water and make sure they are completely soaked. I then take 3 and place them in a bath of pure hypo (I use zone vi). I agitate them in the hypo for 5 minutes and then place them directly in a tray of selenium toner that is mixed using hypo clearing agent/permawash. I tone for 3 to 7 minutes (until I have a slight color change and increase in d-max). I take the prints out and place them in a tray of running water. When I complete this process for all prints. I put them back into the archival washer for another 1 1/2 hour wash. I prefer the archival washer to the tray method because the water washes the prints individually from top to bottom. Gravity helps remove the fixer.
    Often wrong, but never in doubt!

  8. #28

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,512
    Images
    4
    I did what Lee suggested some time ago and got a residual fixer test kit.
    I found no difference between using a constant flow of water over a print and stand and fill method. I tested some test prints on Ilford MGIV going from fix to a holding tray for anywhere from 10 to 20 minutes, then hypo clear, then into trays replacing with fresh water every 15 minutes for 45 minutes. I set up three trays (11x14 for 8x10s and 14x17 for 11x14) so I can transfer prints from tray to tray.

    The fixer test showed no difference between this method and using a cascade style washer. Both showed cleared of fixer by 45 minutes with the initial soaking and then hypo clearing.

    Of course several variables can play into which method someone chooses. The cascade style washers take up much less space and once you insert a print you can forget about it until the time is up. You do use a lot more water.

    One other thing to note is that I think the idea that addding a "fresh" print to either method will re-contaminate the other prints. I have read that this does not happen if the print has been soaked for a few minutes initially and treated with ahypo clearing agent prior.
    "Fundamentally I think we need to rediscover a non-ironic world"
    Robert Adams

  9. #29
    Flotsam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    S.E. New York State
    Posts
    3,221
    Images
    13
    I always hold all of my prints in a tub of water until the end of a session and then bring them through the wash process as a single bunch.

    I have heard from several sources that soaking the prints and then completely changing the water is just as effective as complicated (and expensive) flow and circulation schemes. It is interesting to read posts from those who have confirmed this with fixer tests.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  10. #30

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,879
    Images
    11
    Yep! Actually the soak and dump method is both more effective - and more efficient (than running water) for removing fixer from both paper and film.

    The residual fixer needs to diffuse out of the photographic emulsion and substrate and into the water. Soaking and dumping is the best way to optimize this chemical diffusion process. Ilford, Kodak, et al, test data and other documentation support this. There are multiple APUG threads that discuss this subject.
    Tom Hoskinson
    ______________________________

    Everything is analog - even digital :D

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin