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  1. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob F.
    ... hypo clear followed by 6 x 15 minute soak and dumps.
    By some measure not so efficient of time and resources
    as might be. You're and my method are the same; essentially
    a still water diffusion wash.

    The 6 x 15 soaks are too many and only keep you going back
    and forth unnecessarily. Give the following routine some thought.

    After your last fix, rinse, HCA, rinse then hold. Your holding
    tray is also the first of two trays needed for washing. Place a
    hydrophobic separator sheet on the bottom with about 8 ounces
    of water. Be sure all the air is driven from the sheet. Lay on
    you're print, add another sheet and measure of water. You
    are ready to place the next print. The top of stack print
    must also have a sheet plus measure of water.

    Allow 15 minutes for diffusion to take place after placing the
    last print. Do not disturb. Afterwards repeat for a second wash.
    Allow 30 minutes for diffusion after placing the last print. Do not
    disturb. A third wash is advisable. Allow 60 minutes. I try to time
    matters so that the third undisturbed wash is overnight.
    Rinse once prior to drying.

    Times are flexible. Do allow enough. Above volumes are based
    on 8 x 10s. The deep hypo trays should be a good choice where
    quite a number of prints are to be washed.

    Squeeze, rinse, and Squeeze the separators twixt washes.
    I've tested a few materials and at present have for use sheet
    polyester batting material which is available from
    any fabric outlelt.

    If water is in short supply very thin material can be used
    although a forth or more washes may be needed. As is I've
    archival wash results with less than a liter of H2O per 8 x 10.

    Hassel? Some. But then again two trays, two bucks for the
    separators, and I dare say, less water by quite a margin
    over any other wash method. And don't forget, Do Not
    Disturb. I like that last part especially. Dan

  2. #32
    Saganich's Avatar
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    Bob, Sounds good where could someone get hydrophobic sheeting for $2 a sheet? The only such sheeting I'm familiar with runs about $70 for on 18x18 inch piece. Please where is your source!! Is what you mean by hydrophobic seperator, a membrane which allows the chemistry to pass while resisting water absorption, like a polyethylene or polyproplyene membrane, (possibly silica sheet)? Or is there a less complicated watrer resistent porous material I don't know about?

    Chris
    Chris Saganich
    http://www.imagebrooklyn.com

  3. #33

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    Because I have more water than time I don't use the soak and dump method.

    I process working prints: last fix, hold in rotary washer with a trickle of running water, after last print wash 2 mints (rotary washer) Permawash soak 2 mints, rotary wash 10 mints, dry. Archival fix, hold, 2 mint wash, Permawash 3 mints, move to archival washer for 60 mints then dry. If for some reason I can't get Permawash I use Orbit Bath or HCA and adjust the times. Ilford's recommendation for archival washing is to use their brand of Permawash followed by a 5 mint wash. 16 X 20 or 20X 24 will not fit in either my rotary or archival washer so I use a play pool with 2 Kodak siphons.

  4. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Howell
    Because I have more water than time I don't use the soak and dump method.

    I process working prints: last fix, hold in rotary washer with a trickle of running water, after last print wash 2 mints (rotary washer) Permawash soak 2 mints, rotary wash 10 mints, dry. Archival fix, hold, 2 mint wash, Permawash 3 mints, move to archival washer for 60 mints then dry. If for some reason I can't get Permawash I use Orbit Bath or HCA and adjust the times. Ilford's recommendation for archival washing is to use their brand of Permawash followed by a 5 mint wash. 16 X 20 or 20X 24 will not fit in either my rotary or archival washer so I use a play pool with 2 Kodak siphons.
    Paul, residual fixer is removed from the emusion and substrate by chemical diffusion of the residual fixer (and HCA, if any) into water. As a consequence, it is the soak time plus the removal (dump) of the soak water that determines the archival condition of the washed prints - not the volume of water that you run over the surface of the print
    Tom Hoskinson
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    Everything is analog - even digital :D

  5. #35

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    I fix my prints for 1 minute in a non hardening rapid fix, usually Ilford Hypam at the 1:4 dilution, the prints then go into a 24x28" deep wash tray that is slowly filled by a Kodak tray siphon, this acts as the holding tank. When I'm ready to wash the prints, no more than 6 at a time go into large trays, the first tray is perma wash, and they get continually shuffled in there for at least 5 to 6 minutes. From there they go into a second perma wash tray but this one has selenium toner in it as well, they remain there, with continual shuffling for 5-6 minutes. After that they go into a 20x24" Calumet archival washer with a water flow rate of about a gallon a minute, usually about an hour and fifteen before the first print has gone into and out of the washer. From there they air dry on screens.

    Rapid fixer 1 minute
    holding tank
    perma wash 5-6 minutes
    perma wash with selenium 5-6 minutes
    archival washer 1 hour minimum
    screen drying

  6. #36
    Bob F.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saganich
    Bob, Sounds good where could someone get hydrophobic sheeting for $2 a sheet? The only such sheeting I'm familiar with runs about $70 for on 18x18 inch piece. Please where is your source!! Is what you mean by hydrophobic seperator, a membrane which allows the chemistry to pass while resisting water absorption, like a polyethylene or polyproplyene membrane, (possibly silica sheet)? Or is there a less complicated watrer resistent porous material I don't know about?

    Chris
    Chris, it was Dan who uses the hydrophobic sheeting. I have no idea where such a creature may be obtained. Sounds like a sheet of plastic to me, but I assume it's more involved than that... I use a normal vertical washer now and used to use a plastic tank using a Paterson RC print drier to separate the sheets.

    Cheers, Bob.

  7. #37

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    Chris: For hydrophobic sheeting, you probably should consider low-loft, bonded polyester batting from your local fabric store.

    "Polyester batting is unbonded and is made from synthetic fibers. Regardless of wear and washing, most polyester batting will return to its original shape because it is extremely resilient. It is lightweight, non-allergenic, and cannot be harmed by moths or mildew. Polyester batting starts with polyester fibers that are fed through a carding machine. Once fed through, the blanket or batting that comes out is called unbonded batting. It is available in many weights and thicknesses, but it also has few drawbacks. Its loose construction makes it difficult to work with, and high and low areas often develop. Because there is no finish, the fibers tend to migrate through the fabric in the quilt - a problem of great concern for quiltmakers. To lessen the chance of fiber migration, it is advisable to cover the unbonded batting with cheesecloth or a lightweight fabric. The high-loft, unbonded batting is a popular choice for tied comforters.

    Bonded batting has a light resin coating or glaze applied to both sides of the batting. This coating adds strength and locks the fibers to help prevent fiber migration. The newer, heat-sealed fibers create a similar effect. Bonded batting usually has a higher loft and an airier appearance than a needle-punched batting. It holds up well with use and does not require extensive quilting. Therefore, it is ideal for both comforters and quilts. Because it is so easy to handle, many quiltmakers prefer bonded batting above all others, for both machine and hand quilting.

    Bonded batting is available in low-loft - good for hand or machine quilting, clothing, craft projects, baby stuff; extra-loft - good for hand or machine quilting, padded walls and upholstery, tied quilts and comforters, craft projects; hi-loft - good for comforters; and tied quilts, upholstery, sleeping, baby quilts; crafter's choice - hand or machine quilting, place mats, baby stuff, clothing."
    Tom Hoskinson
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  8. #38
    Saganich's Avatar
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    Tom,

    Great that sounds less expensive then laboratory membrane. For large prints this may be the ideal wasghing method.
    Chris Saganich
    http://www.imagebrooklyn.com

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