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Thread: I gal jug

  1. #11
    kb3lms's Avatar
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    I use PowerADE* PET bottles. If you fill them to the very top they are just shy of a liter. I've been mixing all my chems as 1 liter and then just fill the bottle. Leaves the solution a little "strong" but has given me no problems.

    These PowerAde bottles seem to be made of a heavier PET - probably to keep well in outdoor vending machines in all sorts of conditions. Much sturdier than soda bottles and easy to handle. I have Ilford Multigrade developer in one from about 18 months ago that I've neglected to throw out but it looks fine and I recently tried it and seems to work just fine. Store everything in a cool, dark location.

    (PowerADE is Coca-Cola's competitor to Gatorade - if you have a soccer playing child you go through this stuff by the truckload. Gatorade bottles are not nearly as good - stay away from them.)

  2. #12
    Terry Christian's Avatar
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    Silly question probably, but I've been wondering: how can one tell readily if HCA has gone off and lost its effectiveness, short of doing some sort of chemical test? I have a bunch of Kodak HCA I mixed up some months ago and I don't go through it very fast.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Terry Christian View Post
    Silly question probably, but I've been wondering: how can one tell readily if HCA has gone off and lost its effectiveness, short of doing some sort of chemical test? I have a bunch of Kodak HCA I mixed up some months ago and I don't go through it very fast.
    Terry,

    You've got to stop hijacking threads and doing a bit of research on your own before posting questions like this - please.

    To answer your question though: It took two seconds to find the following:

    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...3cf/e103cf.pdf

    As you can see, Kodak states the life of HCA is 3 months for stock solution in a bottle and 24 hours for working solution in a tray. Working solution in a tank/bottle will last one month. Capacities are also there.

    HCA is largely sodium sulfite and oxidizes quickly. Mix it one-shot if you can. Although mixing part of a package of powdered chemicals is considered bad practice, I think you can get by with doing that with HCA with no ill effects. I once measured the volume of a package of HCA and then just divided by the appropriate numbers to come up with a volume / liter number and used that to mix working solution one-shot. Weighing would be more precise.

    I now mix my own wash aid from sodium sulfite and metabisulfite: 1 Tbsp sulfite and a pinch of metabisulfite per liter. I use Kodak's capacity numbers.

    Best,

    Doremus

    www.DoremusScudder.com

  4. #14
    Terry Christian's Avatar
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    Doremus:
    I sincerely thank you for the valuable information, but I do generally do quite a bit of research before posting and I wasn't truly hijacking a thread. I simply wished to know others' experiences with the breakdown of HCA in the kinds of containers being discussed and how one might tell if it is still viable, so I felt my question wasn't completely out of place. I was already aware of Kodak's tech document, and wasn't asking about Kodak's stated figures.
    I suggest a bit of temperance before blasting others over their perceived faults. So that more ado will not be made over this nothing, this will be my last word on the subject.

  5. #15

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    I use dedicated 1-gallon plastic spring water bottles for mixing film developer, fixer, and paper developer. Just mark off the 1-gallon mark with a waterproof Sharpie pen.

    However, the chemicals are then put into 1-liter plastic seltzer bottles squeezed to eliminate air. I use spring water and seltzer bottles because there are no chemicals adsorbed onto the bottle walls, they protect the chemicals for the maximum 6-month storage period, the caps are sturdy, the thin walls are good for adjusting solution temperature in a water bath, and they don't cost anything. They are stored in a plastic tote so they are away from light.

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