Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,476   Posts: 1,542,654   Online: 785
      
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 35
  1. #21
    jp498's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Owls Head ME
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,467
    Images
    74
    I use the patterson reels and don't have a problem. Dry reels of course. I use a darkroom rather than changing room. I unspool the film+paper, winding the film back up as it is naturally inclined. peel the tape off the film where it attaches to the paper. Toss aside the paper and spindle. Feel the reel and make sure both sides are in the same position. Grab the film end in the middle and guide it into the intake of the reel. Guide it past the ball bearing, and start racheting the reel. My general experience is that once it's on-track through the ball bearings, it will continue like it's supposed to. When I have freshly trimmed fingernails, I spend more time peeling the tape off the film than I do actually loading the reel.

  2. #22
    Steve Smith's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Ryde, Isle of Wight
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    8,592
    Images
    122
    Quote Originally Posted by jp498 View Post
    I spend more time peeling the tape off the film than I do actually loading the reel.
    I find it easier to peel it from the paper and stick it back onto itself (or rather fold it over and stick it to the other side of the film).

    If I'm feeling adventurous I will use it to attach another film and get two onto the reel (this often results in even more new swear words being invented).


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  3. #23
    David Allen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Berlin
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    417
    There is no need to tape two rolls of 120 film together to load them in to a single Paterson reel.

    Best,

    David
    www.dsallen.de

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    FL, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    577
    Why are Paterson Reels so hard to load for 120 film and so easy for 35mm?
    Exactly the opposite for me.
    I've used Patrson reels for years and never a problem with 120 but often have trouble getting a 36 exp 35mm on the reel.

  5. #25
    LJH
    LJH is offline

    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    548
    Before changing reels, consider changing the bag to something like a Harrison tent.

    These are, IMO, one of the best products I have purchased.

    I, too, struggled with a changing bag, but have had no problems whatsoever with the Harrison.

    If you do consider this option, and can afford it, I would suggest getting the biggest tent that you can afford. Not only does it give you more room/more air/longer humidity build-up time, it will allow you to use it if/when you change to a larger format.

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3
    I also have the opposite experience. 120 is awesome on a paterson reel. 35mm ALWAYS ends up jamming on those stupid ball bearings. The Jobo reels are a total piece of cake comparatively. I've honestly never figured out how someone decided the bearings were the right solution. It really reeks of 'if we use this method we can patent it!' to me...thought have no idea if they actually patented it.

    That all said I love the overall Paterson tank. I just don't use it for 35mm.

  7. #27

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Montana
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17
    I've noticed that some Patterson reels are easier to load than others...I've got a "favorite" that I've been using forever that's easy to load. I don't shoot much 35mm, but 120 has always been easy to stuff on it. I don't even use the ratchet action...I just push it in, uncurling it in my hand as I go. Only takes a few minutes start to finish. I load reels sitting on the ledge of my bathtub...I just stuff a towel at the base of the door to keep the light out, and it works fine. I like having lots of room to work in there. I've always had a pair of scissors in there with me to cut the tape off the end...something you guys might not want to do in total darkness LOL.

  8. #28
    Trond's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Harestua, Norway
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    661
    Images
    74
    Quote Originally Posted by David Allen View Post
    There is no need to tape two rolls of 120 film together to load them in to a single Paterson reel.
    True, but taping guarantees that the films do not overlap on the reel. How can one make sure that they do not overlap without taping the films together?

    Trond

  9. #29

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    142
    When the first roll is past the ball bearings, I slide it by hand until I feel it hit the end of the spiral groove. When the second roll is loaded, just be careful not to push it any farther on the spiral and there will be no overlap. The film won't move during developing. I've done hundreds of rolls this way.

  10. #30

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Eastern Kansas
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    278
    Images
    1
    I use the Patterson tank and like others usually trim the sharp corners off the leading edge of 120 film and also bend the film backwards to remove some of the curl. I also experienced problems trying to load film in a changing bag back before I had air-conditioning when it was hot and humidity was high. It's so much easier to do in a darkened bathroom or darkroom, especially if they are air-conditioned.

    Like others, I find loading a 36 exposure roll of 35mm more challenging than a 24 exposure roll. Mine tend to get hard to feed the last 8 to 10 inches of film on a roll of 36.

    Dave

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin