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  1. #1

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    Paterson auto load reel set up for 120 film

    I have a Paterson System 4 Auto Load Reel that is set up for 35mm, I want to moved up for 120 film, I can't moved to this position. Any sugestion on how to do it ?

  2. #2
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LRenard View Post
    I have a Paterson System 4 Auto Load Reel that is set up for 35mm, I want to moved up for 120 film, I can't moved to this position. Any sugestion on how to do it ?
    Boy is this a lot harder to describe than to show!

    1) hold the reel in both hands, with the opening flanges toward you, and the ball bearings farther from you;
    2) while holding the right hand flange tightly, rotate the keft hand flange back, until it clicks;
    3) with the click, you should feel the connection between the two sides loosen, and you should be able to spread the two sides farther apart;
    4) there are three channels on the central core which determine how far apart the two sides are. Move the left side away from the 35mm channel, past the 127 channel and to the 120 channel;
    5) when the left side is lined up with the 120 channel, rotate it forward until it clicks in - you are there.

    Hope this helps.

    PS Welcome to APUG!
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  3. #3

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    I think we've all had this issue when first using the Paterson reels ;-) Instructions in last post are perfect... basically you just need to be a little more forceful than you think. I spent hours trying to change to 120 before realising it just needed a little more grunt ;-)

  4. #4
    dxqcanada's Avatar
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  5. #5
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    You "unscrew" them like an Oreo cookie!
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  6. #6
    EASmithV's Avatar
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    make sure you are turning the sides counterclockwise to each other! And make sure to turn them clockwise when you're done to make sure that they click back into position solidly! you don't want your film unreeling.
    www.EASmithV.com

    "The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera."— Dorothea Lange
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    RIP Kodachrome

  7. #7
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    Question: How many of you guys take your reels apart to get the film out?

    That's the way I have always done it. I pull the film out of the one-way trap then, hold it flat, and "unscrew" the reel and take it apart. Then I lift the end of the film and it unspirals off the reel.

    When it's time to clean up, I find it much easier to wash the reels when they are split apart and they dry better that way, too.

    When they are dry, I put them back together and hang them up on my peg board.

    I don't know... It just seems kind of natural to do it that way. I've always felt a bit confused when I hear of people who have never taken their reels apart.

    So, what's the norm?
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  8. #8
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Worker 11811 View Post
    Question: How many of you guys take your reels apart to get the film out?
    I do.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  9. #9
    andrew.roos's Avatar
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    I leave the reel assembled and bow the120 film slightly so it comes out of the grooves.
    "There are no rules for good photographs, there are only good photographs" (Ansel Adams)



 

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